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  1. Today
  2. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Stainless Steel - Black and Plain

    Thanks. Same response, though - i can't guarantee they'll be made any faster, but there's a note on each size to prioritize if possible.
  3. Chain Wench

    Stainless Steel - Black and Plain

    To add to the SS1258 and 1214 thread, I would also be looking for 3-6 bags of each size.
  4. Yesterday
  5. bjorn

    New to this looking for pointers

    Since I started this foray I started looking into the plate as well and now it's on to youtube to figure out how to build my own trip hammer. I wonder if a press or trip hammer in general would bee better for rings? Larger surface area... harder smack? I dunno just idly wondering. I'll probably just make myself a die so my hammer doesn't go flying across the shop in frustration.
  6. fliberdygibits

    Couple of questions returning to the craft

    I've already got a bunch of stainless, and copper in various hardnesses both 20 and 24 gauge that I've had for years as well as the mandrels for coiling it myself so I'd rather not buy premaid. I did have some modified side cutters and one other pair (don't remember where I got them) for smaller stuff and a pair of knipex for bigger stuff plus a few other assorted cutting tools which where all lost in a move a few years ago. Just looking to replace and wondered what people where using for those smaller gauges. Everything I have is wire I bought from Ringlord.
  7. Konstantin the Red

    Couple of questions returning to the craft

    In re item A: At least a temporary sidestep is to get links that fine pre-cut from suppliers -- can do? Steel wire, or other metals? -- as you know, they use different gauge systems, SWG and the electrical AWG. It is helpful to also give actual wire diameters, which makes it very easy for us readers to figure which gauge if we even want to! Gauge numbers are mostly a convenient shorthand for conversation; they are more awkward to use in more technical discussions, which is what a lot of mail-site threads devolve into. Galvy steel, baling wire, rebar wire -- often labeled in SWG and you might have to look around to find its measured wire diameter. Which the makers have been drawing the wire to all along. Stainless steel -- often in measured wire diameter, metric or decimal inch. Because thoroughly modern metal, no older than about 1917 AD when stainless was invented. Welder wire -- always diameter; seems they think gauge numbers are too primitive. Even more modern than stainless. Aluminum, brass, copper -- AWG, which gauge system is based on the wire's capacity to carry amps and watts and not overheat. I remember advising one English chap who worked part time for a museum who wanted to draw his own wire -- of about any metal IIRC. That kind of museum. Found out stuff about a drawing bench, several old systems for wire drawing, that is, shop and not drawing mill, and special drawing pliers that you could still get for use in Martha Stewarting your own wire, starting from the steel rod. What's special about those things is the harder you pull on them the tighter they grip the wire end. Superpinch!
  8. Konstantin the Red

    New to this looking for pointers

    Well, Home Depot. They had several sizes. I didn't think I'd need the 5-lb. There are probably good ways to use humungous hammers, perhaps by foot power, making a sort of trip- or helve-hammer to use the biggest muscles in your body, your quads. Digression: Armormaking sheetmetal pounders have found that years of hammering with big hammers by hand takes a toll on their joints -- so they recommend doing what will not wear them out prematurely and give you arthritis in middle age. Footpowered helve-hammers are one solution; for some jobs a hydraulic press would be even better, as *no* part of your musculoskeletal apparatus is involved pushing the metal. (Also no banging noises until you take the piece to the hammer & stakes.) English wheel is pretty easy on you too, though it doesn't bend metal well at the edges of the piece, and is a sinking/dishing process pretty much -- thins metal out at the center of the bowl or bulge you are making, so this tool is best used in shallow, rather than acute, curvatures. Auto fenders, breastplates -- suchlike biggies; not gonna work for elbow cops -- those are way too tight, and require a "raising" technique to really get right: rapping metal down over forms and stakes, noodging its periphery to get smaller and smaller (in theory, thicker too) to bulge the flat metal into a curve -- while not bothering nor stretching nor thinning the center of the piece. Ever so much more cumbersome a shop than for mailling.
  9. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Tools - all pliers, cutters etc

    It will not be returning.
  10. CheekyStoat

    Tools - all pliers, cutters etc

    Any idea if the arc welder is returning? I don't even see it listed anymore.
  11. Last week
  12. bjorn

    New to this looking for pointers

    Huh drilling hammer.. Any old hardware store will carry it?
  13. Konstantin the Red

    New to this looking for pointers

    What I picked up for a hammer that is just four pounds from the store is a "drilling hammer," intended for driving rock drills à la John Henry. They come in one-pound increments and look like oldfashioned hammers. What really makes them drilling hammers is they are tempered softer than framing hammers and the like so they don't break or chip being hit on the ends of drill rods. Probably they don't throw sparks the way harder hammers can.
  14. bjorn

    New to this looking for pointers

    Distinctive isnt always a bad thing though. Maybe the problem is my hammer choice then cause my hammer definitely isn't four pounds. I'm using rebar tie wire which is pretty darned squashy to quote someone
  15. Konstantin the Red

    New to this looking for pointers

    I have a biggish anvil that I use -- 72 lb. I suspect a square foot of 1" plate would work as well, though the anvil's hard face (it's a welded anvil) doesn't get worn from this use, and a figure a steel slab likely would, and want regular dressing with a carborundum stone. What I'm doing right now in link flattening seems to call for a hammer of about four pounds' weight. I've used a three-pounder singlejack (baby sledgehammer), which works but sometimes needs more hits. Again, preflattened link ends pretty much never slip off each other, but round-section link ends will plague you that way. And your wire has to be soft enough to be malleable -- do this with squashy wire. Then seek hardening if you really want. This process does not leave tool marks on links needing to be worn off anywhere, and especially so using the softer-tempered 4-lb drilling hammer. It is efficient at flattening out heavier-gauge wire into broad, flat links. Finer-gauge/diameter wire can't spread out that much, not having as much metal to work with. Somewhere in here I'm going to experiment with cup-point nail sets for upsetting rivets with, driving with a light hammer. Smallest available size of nail set, I'd think. Those would leave distinctive toolmarks around the rivet.
  16. bjorn

    New to this looking for pointers

    I hear you on the nights. They're the best for doing pretty much everything but work especially if it's quiet. I did pick up a riveters anvil from somewhere it's pretty teeny maybe I'll give that a go. Main thing I seem to run in to is the rings keep slipping off each other and not flattening. This is probably due to my heat treat or so I've read. That's why I figured that the tongs would give me a better surface to strike on or at very least a way to get the darn things to stop running away!! I JUST WANT TO BE FRIENDS AND HIT YOU WITH MY HAMMER DAMMIT!! Why can't they understand..... In other news I've reached insanity but never fear we are old friends.
  17. lorenzo

    New to this looking for pointers

    You're welcome, I'm stuck covering the night shift this week so it's pretty boring. I hardly need any excuse to go do some "work related" research for an hour.
  18. lorenzo

    New to this looking for pointers

    That is probably why they used hammer and anvil, the last image indicates either that or direct hammer flattening, but then where are all the hammer flattened rings? So it would make sense to me. It's also possible that hammer flattening was more common earlier, since the tool marks have worn away on most early pieces it's impossible to say for sure. Another possible use is for repairs, if a customer brings in a shirt with only a link or two missing in my experience it's difficult to get normal rivet setting tongs in there. It's much easier to put the piece on an anvil and set the rivets with a hammer and punch. I think the 4th image I linked to might be of that sort of work happening since I doubt a customer would normally be waiting otherwise.
  19. Konstantin the Red

    New to this looking for pointers

    You can spot this blacksmiths' technique on larger scales, too. Very obviously, in prison bars and window bars in old jails in Western movies. The grid of bars will have the bars in one direction on the grid quite straight; the bars that intersect them perpendicularly all bulge around the straight bars where they meet; the holes were drifted open and the straight bars inserted through these. No metal lost, maximum strength. Probably fusion/forgewelded after insertion to tie everything firmly together -- heated to orange, hit with a hammer all round. So, the town blacksmith doubtless made them. It's also the way the town blacksmith puts the holes through hammer heads.
  20. Konstantin the Red

    New to this looking for pointers

    So far I've had a high percentage of success at my hammer flattening in two stages: first I give the ends a bashing to flatten them out, more spatulate. Then, I overlap the link ends using the final-size mandrel, say 3/8 ID squeezed to 5/16 with a 5/16 mandrel to make the links consistent (well, fairly consistent -- a few still end up culled out, as I tweak the overlaps to be 3/16" long, total -- the link can finish up too small or too large). The flattened overlapped ends thus won't slip off. A heavy but not very fast blow of the hammer here further flattens these ends. Hit too fast and hard and the ends don't flatten, but get a wedge cross section no good for riveting. Failures from the two-step flattening are few, and are usually because an offcenter hammer hit has shot the link at invisible speeds into the lawn. You can always put up a screen or curtain to interdict these leprechaunlike vanishers. If I like, per Lorenzo, I can squash them with die-/setter-tongs -- with an anneal to allow it. Such tongs may want a hammer-smack on their reins or a specially designed head and jaws anyway, to get the pent-roof cross section in there. That seems part of the purpose of that little bitty anvil seen stuck in the workbenches in some of the pics.
  21. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Anodized Aluminum

    Yes, we have been impacted by the pandemic. Also, we don't typically run just one size of a color; we want to make maximum use of a tank of dye, so that means making as many sizes as we can at one time.
  22. waternerd

    Stainless Steel - Black and Plain

    Thank you, it is very much appreciated.
  23. the-armorer

    A Serena DSC 6752 Miss America

    I cannot image anyway that piece could be comfortable. I do not line them to keep maintenance simple.
  24. the-armorer

    Delena_DSC_8241.jpg

    Lady in Black
  25. the-armorer

    99117052_1675536812594735_3637470707073417216_o.jpg

    Elf with Klingon tendencies
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