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  1. 1 point
    Check it out! Those Indians, with plenty good sense, are using spacer rings for half the links of the mailshirt -- every other row. Saves lots of weave time, as I said. And whaddaya know, there is even a phrase in armor (not so much in mailler) parlance for this recipe for mail: demi-clouée, or "half riveted." Term's found in household inventories when they got round to pawing through the armoire -- the armor closet. A rather bulky piece of furniture because plate armor only folds up so tight, and they wanted to keep an eye on how it was doing stored. No WD-40 in those times, and barely any oil anyway. Much of that being olive, or oil of cloves. Wetted linen and a breeze -- the breeze is a must -- can cool a man even in Texas. The rest of the job is two swigs of Gatorade for the electrolytes chased with a pint-plus of water for the rest of it. Potentially you might drawstring the sleeve cuffs tighter -- you'd want a way to do it onehanded, and most of those ways involve modern camping hold-downs. You'd still have the weight and inertia flopping the mail around; these things slow your sword hand, so anything you can do that reduces weight out there by your hand and wrist improves your combat ability.
  2. 1 point
    Well, the smartness of Bjorn's @$$ is exceeded only by the wisdom of his acreage! Wise Acres is not a housing development in Connecticut... Go ahead, cap up, to keep from disarranging your hair. If I still had the hair to disarrange, that's how I'd do it. Complete with tie-strings under my chin. Linen again. I know -- one more dang thing to put on and take off, although a splash of water from a water bottle into this armyng-coif is cooling and refreshing, if drippy. Cotton breathes, but once it's wetted, the fibers swell and it gets watertight. Terrific for old-school canvas waterbags and collapsible camp buckets, vexing for sweaty armor guys. Lorenzo's describing an interesting bit of lateish-period (Edo?) Japanese concealed armor disguised as just another Japanese jacket; it closes Japanese style like a gi and is lined throughout with either J4-1 or what amounts to E4-1 in open hang. It would armor the wearer long enough to get his katana out and settle his ambushers' hash for them. The sort of thing a lord who had reason to suspect he'd get ambushed the second he stepped out of the Emperor's court -- visible armor being altogether uncouth and also forbidden -- would wear. It would really involve constructing the beast from scratch to really make it right -- consider just how much overlap that thing has in front, and where's the material to come from then? Ordering more mail patches from India might be possible -- and take a while too. Salvage-modifying tends to end up being a kluge and looking like one. I'd advise against that road for that reason. Style is not without importance in armor. Looking good in your tin suit is fun, and inspirational -- Dagorhir I think can get away with wearing a couple-three sweatshirts for body protection, what with their foamy weapons. Nambangusari -- literally "southern barbarian chain" since European ships came up at Japan from southerly waters -- could by not much of a stretch also be translated as "European chain." It looked very different from the several weaves of Japan-chain, especially J4-1 (very square) and J6-1 (decidedly hexagonal patterned) which primarily was used not just as a shirt or a modular pair of mail sleeves but was deployed as a component of armoring the arms, woven in with numerous small iron plates in any arrangement they cared to think up, all put together as the kote, or sleeve, attached to a fabric or light buckskin lining. Often enough each link might be of as many as three turns, and not riveted. As mentioned, the Euro approach to "chain" armor was one they found very intriguing, and one not wholly unsuited to Japanese combat tactics. I'm not sure if Japan undertook to make E4-1 complete with riveted-shut links or if they simply contented themselves with importing the European product. It stayed rare and I suppose remarkable.
  3. 1 point
    It may surprise you to learn that the method of construction you propose is traditional in Japan. It's referred to as nanban kusari(or gusari) and came about from Japanese armorers importing european mail and modifying it to Japanese tastes. It was fairly common from about the mid 16th century to the mid 19th century.
  4. 1 point
    Rob MacLennan

    New to this looking for pointers

    No, you definitely want a speed control. Also a LASER tachometer would be a good idea. The Ringinator website has a very good reference for calculating proper cutting speeds and feed rates, for various metals. This was the way that I went (second half of the video):
  5. 1 point
    Konstantin the Red

    Coif collar

    The 15th-16th-century bishops-mantle was a great big capelike affair, of several configurations from big-doily to angled but broad strip, that manages one way or another to close at the throat -- tied with a length of thong mostly. They hang about to the elbows, completely mantling the shoulders, upper torso, and upper arms. It may or may not feature several -- never many -- large triangular dags to extend coverage a little beyond the edge of the mantle, while also saving weight. It was popular with German and Swiss Landsknechts of the time, as a cheap, simple, fairly lightweight, one size fits all piece of armor, and often enough it was the one piece of armor they bore, without even a helmet. Though they might shade their eyes with a fashionable hat with slashings to go with their slash and puff garb. And notable beards. Mail standards are as a rule smaller -- these really are collars, and feature a band of mail close about the neck, again closing up with lacing or sometimes strap and buckle. Their particularly important bit is this neckband, with the cowl below being considerably abbreviated -- sort of a border or fringe, often with dags to it. Helped it stay tucked in under the breast and back armor. Standards were knightly equipment in fifteenth century plate harness, before the articulated plate gorget developed. Standards seemed to be called that because they stood up around your neck, and might be of tight-weave (small AR) links which would give it some further body. Somebody probably combined such a neckband with a bishops-mantle, as a deluxe model; I've never heard of an example coming down to us in the present day. Both standards and bishops-mantles are depicted in period artwork.
  6. 1 point
    Konstantin the Red

    Coif collar

    Not so culpa. Questions like these are ones you have to ask at the beginning -- though you can have some reading fun searching the site on words like "expansions" etc. -- or "tailored shirt." Not only are we here to be bothered, we also help with the mailler jargon that has developed over the years, so that soon you pick up both the "that's how you fix/do that!" and the lingo.
  7. 1 point
    bjorn

    Coif collar

    Perfect. And I promise going forward to always search the forum before posting repeated topics. I realize now that this is a definite repeat of the same question posed by many other authors. Mea culpa. BJ
  8. 1 point
    Pliers -- just about anything other than needlenoses for most purposes. That said, I have found a specialist auxiliary use for them in making riveted links: shrinking-overlapping, and quickie diameter gauge after the overlapping, as the business end of the pliers is a narrow cone. (Hand cutting a coil can be a bit imprecise. This affects the finished diameter.) But not generally for weaving, as they give the wrong grip and you slip off the link, often as not pinching yourself in the process. For weaving butted links, use pliers with wide jaws -- flat nose beaders' pliers for soft wire, plain ordinary slipjoint pliers for steel armor pieces, or the fancy parallel jaws mentioned by Kittensoft. Riveted links, once prepped, don't need pliers; they snap together like key-rings with your fingers -- and then what you need is a tool to scrunch, or upset, the tiny rivet. For armor mail you can resort to fast, crude cutting methods. Your material, steel wire, is cheap and strong. In the Middle Ages before there were bolts and boltcutters, they seem to have used cold-chisels or something like that. Every size of boltcutter, from 8" mini bolties to quite large ones, gives the identical pinch cut that looks like >< and cuts can be made at rates of like 40 and 50 per minute with the right arrangement to have the cut links fall into a bucket underneath, with the cutter suspended jaws down. Most boltcutters do not fit inside most coils of wire to cut links -- steel Cheerios -- but they don't have to; angle the coil so the ends of the boltie's jaws bear. Or sit and watch television and cut links in your lap -- it's slower, but you get there. This is a good method with small, 12"-14" size bolties. Lay one boltie handle in the crease of your thigh, work the other handle with one hand, feed the coil, angled, into the jaws with the other. Sweep the pile of links you get into a coffee can or something. Because leverage is so much in your favor with this tool, it's very easy on your hands. Timesaver with butted links: stretch out half of your coils to a little over twice their original length. This opens nearly every link in that coil to where you can weave them in easily. This pre-opening opens up a hundred or more links in about two seconds. Though you still need to pre-close the other half of your links, with pliers. Hook preclosed links into preopened links and you are weaving your E4-1 mail on two rows at a time, which at least feels rather faster. Cut these stretched-out coils with your boltcutter just as you would the plain unstretched coil. Happily enough, this cutting gets done with a different part of the jaw edge, so you're rather spreading out the wear farther in from the tips of the jaws. That timesaver doesn't apply to riveted mail -- though buying steel "spacer rings" through a washer manufacturer does cut your riveted mail weaving time in half, so it only takes twice as long as butted weaving rather than four times. You use the spacers like preclosed links, hooking them into an opened link which you will rivet closed to finish up.
  9. 1 point
    losthelm

    New to this looking for pointers

    I'm a fan of the knipex cobolts mini bolt cutters. They are an investment that pays off after your first shirt or so. With pliers it's worth checking what other chainmailers are using. Many of us make small modifications such as wrapping the handles or grinding and filing down the jaws for personal preference or a specific need.
  10. 1 point
    Restock at least 3 to 4 months. We are talking to manufacturer to make a few changes and get them made again.
  11. 1 point
    it's (obviously) entirely up to you, but personally i've given up on the idea that if i'm not making my own rings, i'm not a true mailler. (the fact that i'm usually doing titanium is probably another factor.) i don't mine or smelt the ore, i don't mix the alloy or draw the wire; so if someone else has the knowledge, tools, and processes to make the rings much more efficiently than me, i'm willing to pay for it. just my 2 cents.
  12. 1 point
    A shirt is a large, though straightforward, project. If you are not an unusually large person, you're probably going to use five, six, or seven bags of 3K links per by way of quantity. Expect to concentrate at least 25 pounds of links into this -- 14ga (.080") links are stout. Once you have woven anything with some area to it you are going to succeed at building a shirt. Whether the kit instructs well or poorly, you will be able to build a good, livable, flexible, agile shirt indeed suited to fight in -- SCA rattan, anyway -- by downloading and keeping the Trevor Barker instructions, which reproduce a 15th century German mailshirt and you can do any mods you'd like, such as sleeve length, confidently. You can't get into serious trouble quickly at all, weaving an E4-1 shirt in butted links. Shirt making is something close to knitting a sweater. It feels like a sweater wearing it; weighs like a backpack, clings like a sweater. https://web.archive.org/web/20160508055350/http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm It's about four pages of typescript and diagrams. Read Section 3 attentively. A mailshirt with a bit of a waistline to it can still be pulled on over your head, but will be less inclined to try and sneak downhill through your cinch belt as you move about than a straight tubular torso will be. You're taking some advantage of mail's dragginess over any bodily hump.
  13. 1 point
    Found the design for this on theringlord.coms facebook. The design is credited to Amelyna.olga on instagram in the Facebook post.
  14. 1 point
    Reposted by request, even though it breaks its own message length rule! >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> How To Talk To People On A Discussion Forum After years of participation in online forums, I've identified a few important rules to follow if you want both respect from your peers and results from your queries. I've listed these points below, with explanations of each. If you feel that one or more of these points describes you, please don't take offense, these are general observations, not personal attacks. Forum Subjects If you are on a board that has multiple forums, each with its own description of what kind of stuff should go into that forum, read the blasted descriptions before you post! Nothing pisses moderators off faster than having to police your poorly aimed topics, and even if they let you be, your fellow posters will probably chew you out for wasting their time. Subject Lines Folks, these are there for a reason. They let other people know what you want to talk about. Don't make them impossible to figure out, with meaningless drivel like "Wanted to know", or "My Opinion". Put real, useful clues in them to explain the post topic. This gets the attention of people who have an interest in the subject, rather than either a)being ignored, which gets you no responses/help, or B) annoying people who open your message just in case, because they don't want to miss anything, and find their time wasted. Please consider. If you are reading the posts on a board, and see a subject like "A Question...", what does this tell you about the post inside? Absolutely nothing! What does it tell you about the poster? Probably that they can't organize their thoughts well enough to be worth reading in the first place! Language Skills Look, no one expects a PhD in literature on a forum, but if you write as though you were an idiot, people will think you are an idiot. The basics of spelling, punctuation, and grammar are not beyond the grasp of an 8-year-old, so you should probably do OK, if you at least try. And don't give me any crap about how you never went to school, have a learning disability, or no one on your MMORPG has any trouble understanding you! All we're asking is that you try, just a little. This isn't just about people being anal, WE DON'T UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE SAYING! The harder people have to work to read your post, the more negatively inclined they will be toward you and your subject. Spelling's a big one. It's really a no-brainer. If you have spelling issues, use a spell checker. You don't even have to do any of the work yourself, for Pete's sake! Also, if you choose to use an unfamiliar word, make sure it's the right one. Many words sound the same, but are spelled differently, and mean completely different things. Picking the wrong one makes you look like an uneducated boob. If I write a post about taking the sun to school this morning, you'll probably figure out what I really meant, but you'll think I'm a dumb-ass... Punctuation is also a huge deal, despite what you might think. Again, we don't need thesis-level work on the correct usage of semicolons in the case of multiple adjectival clauses here, just follow three simple rules: When you reach the end of a complete thought, put in a period and a space or two. We call this a sentence. Start the next one with a capital letter. Wherever you would pause while saying the sentence out loud, put in a comma. This way we know what parts of a sentence are linked together. When you've put together a bunch of sentences that relate to a common point, and are going to move on to a new point, you have completed a paragraph. In honor of this rare and joyous event, skip a line before you start the next one. Grammar's a tough one, I'll admit it. Even the most anal board posters will sometimes disagree on what's the right way to say something. Just give it your best shot, and know that of the three language skills, this is the one most people will give you a pass on, as long as you get the others right. Message Length Throw us a bone here, folks, if you've answered a post with a one or two word response, you are wasting all our time and resources at the very least, and are risking banishment for trying to boost your post count at the worst. This will not make you any friends. Likewise, give our eyeballs a break on the long ones, people! This is a tough one. How do you find the line between a well reasoned, detailed response versus a droning, endless lecture/sermon? Well, here's a simple guideline. If your logic to describe a single point requires more than one paragraph, and you have more than one point to make, you are writing a lecture. I refer you to my basic point from the language skills section: "The harder people have to work to read your post, the more negatively inclined they will be toward you and your subject." If you find yourself writing a lecture, consider a) putting it in multiple posts, if you only have two or three points, B) assuming your audience can think rationally and only writing a couple of sentences per point (this has risks, including the need to re-explain misunderstood points later), or c) summarizing your essay in your post, and then putting in links to one or more articles (like this one) which give your detailed rationales for those invested enough in the topic to go read them. Discussions vs. Arguments You will *NEVER* win a debate by attacking your opponent individually. Period. You can pick apart their logic. You can even quote their own previous statements back to them. However, as soon as you use a phrase like "You always do this", "The problem with people like you is", or "You don't seem to be capable of understanding my simple logic", you have crossed the line. In fact, if you even say something that implies a personal attack, you have crossed the line. From that point on, barring well orchestrated outside intervention and/or mediation, your exchange will no longer bear any fruit, because an attacked mind is on the defensive, and closed to anything further you have to say. All you can do from there is gather supporters and let the flame war begin. So before you let your frustration, however understandable or warranted, be expressed in your message, consider that a) you may have misunderstood them, B) they may have misunderstood you, and c) even if neither of the previous are true, the moment you click the send button on an attacking message, you've already conceded defeat.
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