Scott12357

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About Scott12357

  • Rank
    Likes to Kick People
  • Birthday 10/03/77

Profile Information

  • Location
    Lawrence, KS
  • Interests
    Beekeeping, gardening, reading SciFi, Tae Kwon Do
  • Occupation
    Chemist
  • The year you started making chainmail
    1998
  1. I don't know that making a shirt as first projects is really all that bad. My first project was a very simple E4-1 belt. The next was a J6-in-1 shirt with an inlay that I had not pattern for--just guess and check. I made the shirt is 1714 galvy and 1814 brass. All of the rings for both projects were made by hand (coiling, cutting--with nippers). While the shirt took a very long time, it is still my favorite piece that I've made. For some people, the "Go big or go home" adage works best with their personalities and plans. I have loved mail from the first time my buddy introduced me to it. While I don't do it as a profession, I've put in a fair amount of time into it and have gotten quite a few compliments on the quality of my work. If you want to make a shirt, just make it. I've used a tank top for sizing for someone and it came out great. I just pulled it to full stretch and added another couple rows to make sure it would fit the intended wearer. I've still never seen a pic of the true recipient wearing it. Still gotta pester my buddy about that. When I get it, I'll post.
  2. The shirt's awesome! I can't wait to see more pics. Congrats on the nuptuals! One of these days I need to try to make something out of scales.... *sigh*
  3. Which store in the Great Mall of the Great Migraine? (My sister-in-law nicknamed it that because of the horrendous carpeting.) I live in Lawrence and work in Lenexa, so it'd be nice to see the work of another mailler every once in a while.
  4. It's beautiful!! I raise my pliers to your magnificence.
  5. I've been mailing for about 12 years and it's mostly a hobby. I have made a little bit on some commissioned pieces, but the couple times I tried to do a craft fair, I barely got the cost of the booth back. I much more enjoy the process than trying to make money off of it. If I could find a way to make maille pay the bills and then some, I might be tempted, but I'd probably not pursue it. I like maile more for the artistic nature and the challenge of making new pieces. I've got a few completed inlays that I should post pics of, but it's not been a high priority.
  6. Whoever made this really did a fantastic job! The whole thing is exquisite, though I really like how the bodice looks. Impressive. Most impressive.
  7. My buddy did that with a mail vest he made a few years back. Granted he used 912 Aluminum for the maile portion (which he wound and cut himself--talk about Popeye forearms by the time he was done.) It looked really good. The scale should look pretty good also. He made the leather straps on the sides so that they overlapped a bit. Just my $0.02.
  8. Well met, Lonewolf. The inlay looks fantastic! Keep up the good work!!
  9. Beautiful! Now I have another inlay I want to make. I'll want to make a whole collection of Star Wars inlays. Any chance of getting the pattern?
  10. Michaels Arts and Craft store has them too--at least locally.
  11. Just remember: This is my BOOMstick!
  12. I keep bees (and sell the honey). I also crochet, keep a garden, woodworking, read and TaeKwonDo--I'm a brown belt.
  13. If you think about it, coin collectors buy money all the time--and a lot of it is still in circulation. There's one guy I work with who would guess that his collection is worth probably $100K, though the face value of the coins is probably closer to $3K. It's all a matter of perspective. I've also seen people selling origami dollars at a craft show for 5X the value of the bill. I would venture to guess that it's legal (or at least the government turns a blind eye to the exchange) so long as you are not defacing the currency. (And for low-value currency like coins, the government probably doesn't care even if the currency is defaced.) Consider this: It costs about 2 cents to make a penny, and about 10 cents to make a nickel. Yeah, government!! -Scott
  14. I like the third and fourth pairs. They seem to have good symmetry without being excessively long.
  15. Congratulations on the great sales opportunity and making a couple sales. I've had some luck with a similar situation. My mom was wearing a bracelet and someone from church asked where she got it from. Needless to say, I ended up selling her 3 sterling silver bracelets and a necklace/bracelet set made of galvy. (The best part of the whole thing is that the bracelet my mom was wearing wasn't even something I made!)