Craine

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About Craine

  • Rank
    Apprentice
  • Birthday 06/11/65

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    GA, US
  1. Well, I am having some free time this weekend...
  2. ...disguised as an UPS delivery man!
  3. I just finished a rather peculiar commission... I was asked for a chainmail shirt for a doll. Not an ordinary toys-r-us doll, but some special expensive kind. The lady in question is apparently a doll enthusiast. Hey, I am doing chainmail, so who am I to judge, right? Anyway, I did it in 19g 5/32" which would be about the right size if a regular shirt made of 12g 1/2" were to be scaled down. Because of the odd anatomy of the doll I had to make it with the back open, and added special rings and a lace to pull the shirt tight and close around the doll body. The back looks odd, but that didn't seem to matter in this case. And in front it looks pretty good if I say so myself.
  4. An eye for art helps a lot when you want to make jewelry. Everybody can do the standard stuff. It is the special stuff that draws the eye of the prospective buyer.
  5. Yeah, it might look like I might have to make another trip to Harbor Freight. I like those mini pliers they have. They are just larger then beading pliers with ergonomic handles that fit my hands well and have a nice light spring. Can't beat the price either. Never did such a heavy modification before tho. So far I only removed teeth and edges on pliers.
  6. Just another crazy thought I had after reading the other discussion about sanding down pliers... I was wondering about pliers used to close small rings over large rings, like you would do with a Japanese weave. In that case the nose of the pliers would hold the small rings close to the large rings in order to get a decent grip so you can close them. But the actual surface area of the pliers gripping the small ring is very small. Would it be possible to grind/sand the nose of pliers into a V-shape, so the large rings would fall partially into the V and the pliers would have a much larger surface area with which to hold onto the small rings? Obviously the V can't be so big as to fully encase the large rings, for then you wouldn't be able to turn the pliers anymore. But a gentle curve of the nose might still help a lot. Does anybody have experience with this?
  7. Very nice!
  8. I have noticed the same thing. It gets even worse when you compare AA1212 (AR 5.1) with AB1212 (AR 5.6). That seems like a huge difference. Until you do some calculations... AA1212 is reported as being 2.5mm in diameter with an ID of 13.1, which my little calculator tells me comes to an AR of 5.24 (not 5.1!). And AB1212 is reported as being 2.4mm in diameter with an ID of 13.31, which my little calculators tells me comes to an AR of 5.46 (not 5.6!). AR's of 5.24 vs. 5.46 are a lot closer then 5.1 vs. 5.6. A difference in aluminum used for AA and AB matters, as does springback which is likely to be different for the different type of aluminum, as does some anomalous listing by TRL. If you make something tight and you need to be sure, I suggest to get yourself some nice digital calipers and do your own measurements.
  9. Charge them. If they want custom work they will have to pay a custom price. Charge them through the nose! Make sure you get enough money to cover any possible future issues with the work.
  10. Actually, you can't pull them off unless you take tools to them. There is a layer of acrylic spray covering the scale and decal to protect it. I have been experimenting some more with them and found that if I make the decal larger so as to cover almost all of the scale the edge of the decal and the edge of the scale are so close they become indistinguishable. The results look much better then shown above. When I have some time I'll see if I can make a photo.
  11. These work very well for me. The parts that hold on to the glasses are flexible and rubber tipped so I don't think they will break or scratch my glasses. The flip-hinge seems to be just plastic and I imagine it will break eventually through use. But it should last a decent while. I actually have two of them, one as linked above magnifies x1.5 which I use most often. The other magnifies x2 and I only use when I do fine work below 1/8" or so. I got them both from Amazon, but I suspect some Hobby shops may carry them as well.
  12. Neither did I. I ordered them from ConsumerCrafts.com. Those, together with some claps, pins and other findings and I had an order over $100, which meant free shipping. All in all, I think it was money well spent. I believe with my next TRL order I shall have more types of rings rings then I have storage for tho. So, I likely have to order some more.
  13. I have all my rings and findings organized by gauge and size and stored in a container system called Darice Interlock (I love this stuff!!). The great thing about this is that I can pick out the little boxes for the rings I need, so they only take up a small amount of desk space. All the boxes are labeled so i know exactly what is in it. My pliers are all perched on the edge of a desk drawer which is always open a few inches. Inside that same drawer are more tools, like cutters, files, helping hands, and of course a jar of Tool magic, some Carson magnifier clip-ons for my glasses (which I recommend) and other such minutia. Then I pre-open a pile, pre-close another pile (or multiple piles if I have more colors or sizes) all on a beading mat, and start weaving. If I stop halfway through I fold over the beading mat onto my work and piles of rings to keep the stuff together and away from the cats. ps. Yes, I looked at the Really Useful Boxes as well. But the Darice Interlock system is a good deal cheaper, and fully transparent and more accessible.
  14. The pliers are all sanded down, not a sharp edge anywhere. And coated in Tool Magic. Still, I did a few searches and apparently there are options to touch up anodized aluminum. But none are truly suited to rings or scales. There is something called Birchwood Casey Aluma Black. Which is a paint to be rubbed into a scratch. Mostly aimed at guns and such. But only available in black. There are feathering pens, again not in the usual colors. Although Gold maybe promising. Krylon has spray paints called X-Metals that makes it look like it is anodized aluminum. Which of course is not suited for small rings and scales. Perhaps a decent option are Touch up pens for cars. Anybody have experience with those?
  15. I am using Tool Magic for now. Waiting for the Plasti-dip to be delivered. Still...maybe I am a perfectionist.