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dogsoldier

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    8
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About dogsoldier

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 06/25/1979

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central Ohio
  • Interests
    you would not believe how many interests I have
  1. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    That's precisely what I'm wondering. I'm sorry if I was unclear. Am I too low or are the other pieces priced too high to actually sell? My primary focus will be drinking horns, runes and simple blacksmithed items as well as handmade leather goods in order to draw in a certain customer base, and knowing that those people will be interested in armor as well, I wanted to offer a few higher priced items that would appeal to them and I happen to enjoy making. Without getting into a religious debate, there aren't a lot of dealers providing reasonably priced Heathen products. I can make a traditional drinking horn for about 6 bucks and sell for $30 or $40 with a holster. I want to know how much those individuals (with the money to spare) or any other regular person would pay for a decent piece of armor. Dodecahedron- I think you were the type of mailler they were defending. Nothing beats personal service.
  2. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    In a couple of posts I feel as though it has been implied that the quality of my work is in some way inferior for some reason. I certainly can see why, because of the word "newbie" above my blank avatar and the number of posts below it showing that today was my first time. I have, however, been making and selling mail for more than 12 years and have been a member and avid reader of this forum (as well as others) for more than 3 years. I take pride in the quality of all the work that I do. That having been said, the way that I have always priced things has been to look at them and ask myself honestly, "how much would I pay for that?" If the answer is less than it's worth to sell it I don't make that thing again, unless I want one for myself. I also make musical instruments out of unusual items like cigar boxes and soup cans. If I were to sell those things I would need to get at least $120 for a 3-string canjo. Would I pay that much for a stick and a can with some strings attached? No, I would not. So I build them simply for my own amusement. I do feel that a $200 "profit" for some scale mail is very much worth the effort to sell. All of that aside, I appreciate all of the useful comments from everyone, I certainly have a new perspective and I do intend to reevaluate my pricing strategy before putting anything up for sale. Thank you, everyone... and the iMaille was very funny.
  3. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    I guess there are two different ways of looking at this. One is from the perspective of an individual selling an item they made and are only looking for what they consider to be fair compensation for their time, the other is that of the business owner trying to squeeze as much profit as they can out of the items they produce. I wasn't looking at it from the opposite perspective before. I am not a business, I'm just a dude with some pliers and a little inspiration. I have a full time job at a graphics design company where I get to do all sorts of unusual and interesting things on a daily basis and I make a pretty comfortable living at it as well. The craft projects that I do in my spare time have more of a cultural and religious significance to me, but even from a purely economic stand point it would seem that selling a piece for a moderate profit would be more beneficial than not being able to sell it at what would be a substantial profit. If it won't sell you aren't making a profit, you are taking a loss. My question is, at what point does the risk of not selling an item out weigh the potential for increased profit? And how likely are people to actually buy an item in the price range of my previous examples?
  4. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    j_betts, that's pretty much how I feel about it. Just getting paid for what I'd probably be doing anyway seems like profit enough, to some extent. Once it feels like work I suppose I'd probably want more.
  5. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    The first one took approximately 15 hours. Now that I've got it figured out I'm sure it would go quicker.
  6. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    I wouldn't be selling anything for just the cost of materials. 2000 mild steel scales are about $70 and are more than enough to do the vests that I designed myself. Add in the $30 cost for leather and hardware it's about $100 total. If I sell that vest for $300 that leaves me with an additional $200 I didn't have before. I have no intention to ever try to create a "work of art" with chainmail, I've already got that covered in other areas of my life, so I guess I would prefer to be seen as a craftsman making high quality original designs of functional armor geared more towards re-enactors. I don't plan on making bracelets, necklaces or dresses.
  7. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    I don't want to post pics of other people's work for fear of singling out individuals that might be members here, but this is one of the pieces I plan on selling. The chainmail is 14 ga. 5/16 id galvanized steel with laces up the front. The vest is mild steel large scales with laces on the sides and leather harness. I plan to sell the set for $600 and vests by themselves for $300. Is this not enough? I don't want to make a whole bunch of stuff that is just going to sit around in my garage and not make me any money because no one will buy it at the prices I'm selling them for.
  8. dogsoldier

    Selling pieces on Etsy

    I will be opening my own Etsy shop soon to sell some of the craft projects that I have been doing for a while. These projects include hand carved runes, drinking horns, leather bags, chainmail, and scale mail. This has led me to start checking out what others are charging for products similar to what I will be offering and I have to say that I am honestly shocked at how much people seem to think their stuff is worth. I don't want to call anyone out specifically but here are some examples of what I'm talking about. Scale mail bikini for $250 Chainmail mantle with scale sleeves for $300 Scale mail vest with chainmail backand no sides for $550 Chainmail dress with some scales for $900 Most unbelievable... 16 x 42 inch sheet stainless steel scales for $3000! Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying they can't sell stuff for what they think it's worth and I'm not saying they aren't nice pieces. I'm just wondering if anybody actually ever buys these things. If it's priced so high that no ordinary person could afford it, is it even worth selling? I'm not trying to offend anyone here by asking this (if the above examples belong to members of this forum). If it is indeed common to sell pieces in that price range perhaps I need to reevaluate my asking prices.
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