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Blessed Wrath

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About Blessed Wrath

  • Rank
    Non-Conformist #226-749
  • Birthday 04/29/1981

Contact Methods

  • MSN
    blessedwrath@hotmail.com
  • Website URL
    http://www.freewebs.com/blessedwrath/missinglink.html

Profile Information

  • Location
    Lansing, Mi
  • The year you started making chainmail
    1999
  1. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    I see.
  2. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    It might be, depending on what's necessary. I've seen some pretty complex circuits done DIY for just a few dollars.
  3. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    I don't suppose there's an option for an "intelligent system" which would automatically shut off the flow of power once it's determined that a proper weld temperature has been reached... Such a system might monitor drops or peaks in voltage, ring temperature, sudden movement (from the ring ends being hot enough to fuse together, which would cause the ring to move slightly; I've experienced little "jolts" like this before), etc. The system would omit the timer altogether, and simply stop welding when the ring is "ready". The idea is sort of like how voltage control happens in a laser driver with an intelligent circuit: The variable resistance adjusts to match a desired feedback, which is set by the load, thus evening out any high or low voltage spikes from the power source. I think that the most likely option would be to monitor for differences in current flow. Does a metal become more or less conductive as it heats up? If so, it might be possible to set up the system to stop heating the ring when it reaches a specific conductive range. Am I crazy?
  4. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    I must need much more practice than I thought. When the electrodes are that close together, my failure rate becomes exponentially higher; even if I start at zero and work my way up. It seems as though there are only two possibilities with a short gap: Not enough, and too much. Either the ring only gets a minor weld, which is easily broken, or the ends are totally blown away, sending molten metal flying in all directions. Perhaps a more detailled tutorial, for shop newbs like me?
  5. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    I use about 1/5 of the timer's maximum setting, and it seems to work well for me. I've found that spacing the electrodes a little farther apart protects the ring better againt burning, but that it takes a little longer to weld. I like this idea.
  6. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    <0.1s/weld for 14g stainless? I'm using more than that for 20!
  7. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    The welder works, and it works well. The only gripe I have is the learning curve, which I am proud to say I seem to be overcoming gradually. The welds I have been able to produce appear as a slight bulge (in extreme cases, a "ring" protruding from the weld point, running perpendicular to the direction of the ring). Failed welds are common, including slipped ends, and "burnt" ends (welds in which the wire did not properly fuse, but instead melted away from one another). My test piece, constructed from 1/4" ID 18g stainless rings, woven in Euro 8:1, withstood fifteen shots from my Daisy Powerline at point blank range (480fps, .177cal BBs), and multiple shots from a 50lb draw crossbow (metal-tipped pointed bolts) against both a pillow and a hard wood surface. There was zero penetration during testing. I couldn't even locate a single impact point. When I shot the test piece, against the wood surface, with my crossbow, the test piece actually bounced (along with the bolt) high enough into the air that it nearly touched the ceiling! I broke one bolt, damaged another, and lost all 15 BBs used in the test. No living being was harmed during this test. The best advice I would give to a new user is to avoid twisting the ring while welding. This can slip the ends past one another, and destroy the weld. I use a pair of vice-grip pliers, adjusted below its minimum clamping range (jaws touch well before the locking mechanism can engage), to hold the ring while welding, because its grip quality is best suited to the task. I find myself completely unable to use non-serrated pliers due to slippage and lack of precise control. If I had to name an ideal tool for this job, it would definitely be needle-nose, serrated jaw, vicegrips. The process of assembly moves much more smoothly along the X-axis (parallel to the direction of the maille) if one welds a number of rings first, then assembles them as in the "speed-weaving" method (note that I make no claim as to whether or not this process is faster, only that it facilitates better welding), because of the reduction in the number of welds which must be made with "rings in the way"; welding a single ring is much easier, faster, and more efficient than trying to navigate around its neighbors. For the Y-axis, I return to welding one-ring-at-a-time. My adjustments to the timing mechanism eventually adopted an "as little as possible" approach after the first few welds. It seems to be a critical component in whether or not a successful weld can be made. Start at zero, for any given ring, and make small adjustments to the timer until a satisfactory weld can be made, then leave the setting alone. I strength-test one of my welds once every few dozen or so, to ensure that the quality of each weld is meeting my expectations. As expected, welding galvanized is not recommended, due to the vaporization of the zinc layer -which, to my best knowledge, can result in the production of zinc oxide gas. It took a bit to get used to the idea of pushing a ring into the electrodes. At first I was convinced that I had to push toward one of the electrodes, out of an expectation that they would naturally move apart from one another if I pressed in between them. Once I figured out that they could be tightened sufficiently to prevent this, things became easier. It may be unnecessary, but I would recommend at least tinted safety glasses (in addition to the heat-resistant gloves included in the kit) to prevent discomfort of the eye. The bright glow from the welding process can leave spots in your vision, or cause headaches, similar to brief glimpses at the sun. This effect can be worse if your workshop is dimly lit. The safety glasses can also protect your eyes from flying sparks, which have been infrequently observed during my test welding. Overall, I would like to have seen either a lower price for the product, or a small number of minor improvements for the price. Realistically, the product offers an immeasurable benefit to manufacturers of maille, and maille-related items, that are expected to endure unreasonable amounts of stress, and that benefit is absolutely worth the money spent. If I was told tomorrow that I could hand this item back to its maker for a full refund, I would decline that offer. I would encourage any mailler who wishes to enhance the strength of his products to try this product. That's all I can think of, for the moment. If I remember something else about my experiences with this product, I will edit this post to reflect the new information. My thanks to both Lorenzo, and to The Ring Lord, for developing this product.
  8. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    I have a question about the timing switch. From what the diagram says, I'm fairly certain that the wires run left/left, right/right, but I have to be 100% certain before I plug it in. Does the polarity matter for this type of electronics? It also seems to suggest that both the footswitch and the welder need to be plugged in, since both have cords (and the booklet doesn't tell me to cut one of them). Is this true? If so, why?
  9. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    And here I thought I was being clever. Well, at least it's good to know that these things are being thought of. I never expected to be able to properly weld maille! Thanks for the R&D, TRL, and here's hoping we can all make our processes smoother in the future.
  10. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    I can definitely see that becoming a problem; especially with thicker/stronger rings. Of course, the best option would be bolting it directly to a tool stand, or bench, but not all of us have that option. Good thinking, Lorenzo. For my contribution, I suggest this (however (im)possible it may be): Rather than attempting to push the ring against the electrodes, would there be another way to exert pressure on the ring? I thought about some sort of pincer mechanism -perhaps built into the electrodes- that would push the ends of the rings together during the weld process. If I'm not mistaken, this is how normal spot welds are made in the first place. Any pliers you might fit in there would have to be placed between the electrodes, which of course runs the risk of welding the pliers to the ring, melting, and/or otherwise damaging the whole setup. The best method I could think of is to place some sort of hand lever, or foot switch, into the electrode assembly that would cause them to "pinch" the ring between them. Copper being a soft metal, this may not exactly be a good thing to do to your electrodes. Is there a stronger material with an equally low resistance?
  11. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    Soo...I bought the welder, and I have a question. In my email confirmation, where it lists the rundown of all that happened during the transaction, it says I have 400 "points". I feel it is necessary to describe the confused look on my face, since nobody can see it over the net. What points? Where do we get them from, and how are they spent? Are they spent at all? What does one get from them?
  12. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    Thanks so much, Mr. Daniels. I have been searching for a way to quickly, efficiently, and properly fuse my rings shut for the ten years I have been mailling. It would be a shame, to say the least, if I were to miss out on that now, just because I took too long to raise the money.
  13. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    Ok, so, here's my question: I'm nearing the bottom of my finances, but I want this welder. I can afford to spend the money, but I have to know how much I've got coming from my next paycheck first. Is there a way that I can be guaranteed one of these devices? I just don't want to miss out, like I did with the AMS.
  14. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    Yeeeah, this one's going on my priority list. I have wanted "real" welded maille for a long time, and, from what I see out of this unit, this is it. I can't wait to test the possibilities; and, by "test", I certainly mean launching various high-velocity bits and bobs at my hard work. ^_^
  15. Blessed Wrath

    Resistance Ring Welder Kit

    Is this kit shipped in usable condition, or does it require modifying/assembly which necessitates specialty skills?
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