Rognik

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About Rognik

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  1. Thank you very much for the quick response! I can wait a week, and I would like to bundle the order with a couple other things you have in stock. So it seems like waiting for it to be in your shipping center would be easiest. I assume it will show up on the store page at that point, and I'm set up to get an email when it does. If any of that's not true, please let me know.
  2. Is this now the de facto place to ask about your high carbon steel rings? I am wondering when you'll have a lot of 16 gauge, 1/4 inch ID, machine-cut, high-carbon steel rings back in stock. They've been out for a few weeks I think. I'm interested in ordering about 50-60 pounds (going to start working on a full suit of maille!).
  3. I'm still thinking about whether I want to use stainless or carbon steel. I found a local company that does heat-treating, and I am going to ask them for a quote. If it's not too terribly expensive, I'd like to go that route, at least for my first piece, so I can learn how to do it properly. I am also sure I can find a kiln I could use in the area, so that would be plan B. To be on the safe side, I may want to normalize the steel, as Rob mentioned. What would be the process for that? Would it be the same as hardening, but without quenching? Annealing, essentially? Also, I am assuming that the piece will need to be supported on some kind of ceramic plate while it is removed and quenched so it doesn't deform under its own weight while the steel is hot and soft. losthelm, thanks for the app recommendation. It looks like it is missing 1062, although it has a lot of information about 1060, which I assume is almost identical. It has a tiny blurb about 1064 as well. Thank you once again for all the advice.
  4. Thank you very much, Jeremy and Rob. That helps a lot. I'm not looking to get a forge capable of reaching those temperatures for this project (I'd like to someday). But I am interested in your suggestion to find a company that could do this. Forgive my ignorance: what kind of company should I look for? I mean, does it have to be a blacksmith? Do welders have this kind of equipment? I may stick with the spring temper stainless steel for this project after all. But I am really interested in learning blacksmithing someday, so this is great information. Thank you again.
  5. Hello, I recently bought The Ring Lord's resistance welder, and I've got it up and running pretty well. I'm planning to use it to make a fully welded hauberk, which will be my second (my first was made from TRL's galvanized steel kit, which of course can't be welded). I'm going to make it out of 16 gauge, 1/4" ID wire, which I think should make a nice, relatively dense weave. Originally I was planning to use stainless steel, but now I think that I would like to use high carbon steel (specifically TRL's "high carbon steel alloy 1062"). I realize that the hauberk will need to be cared for, but I really like the authenticity of carbon steel and would like to learn to work with it. The thing is, switching to carbon steel creates a problem which is briefly mentioned in the free booklet for the welder: On the subject of heat treating high carbon steel, the description of the rings in The Ring Lord's shop says: So, clearly heat treating is both doable and somewhat necessary for this project. My question is, how can I heat treat the hauberk after welding to make the strongest armor possible? I know enough to experiment a bit, but where should I start? I have tried to do some research on tempering carbon steel, but I couldn't find anything very specific. I especially couldn't find anything specifically for maille, which I imagine will heat and cool differently than a solid piece of steel, and could potentially deform while heated. Any tips or instructions to get me started would be appreciated, but here are some specific questions: What temperature/color do the rings need to be heated to? How long should that heat be maintained? How should they be cooled? (Quenched or air-cooled?) At the risk of sounding terribly amateurish, can I do this in a kitchen oven which goes up to 550° F? Some additional information: I've already experimented with welding both stainless and carbon steel a bit, and confirmed that the carbon steel's heat-affected zone becomes brittle. Honestly, just making the rings less brittle would be sufficient, because this armor will just be for a costume, but I want to make the armor as tough as possible, just for the satisfaction of it. Thanks! PS Attached is a picture of the welder and the rings I am considering.