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Jon Daniels

How to use a Jumpringer type tool (aka Pepe, Koil Kutter, etc)

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You'll note we don't sell any jumpringer type tools. Why - because I don't like any of the available tools. These tools are designed for jewelers who occasional need a few hundred jumprings. For chainmailler's you'll save yourself a lot of time and money by either buying rings or building a drill press or lathe based saw.

In my opinion the only reason to buy a jumpringer, pepe jumpringer, koil cutter, etc is because they are readily available to buy at jewelry supply stores. The systems that actually work are not available as easily.

If you do insist on using one of these tools here are some bits of advice:

1. The 3 rules of saw cutting are lubricate, lubricate and lubricate. If everything else is perfect, and you are short of lube, your blades will literally burn and your rings will have a lot of burrs.

2. You can't cut any steel, titanium or niobium - absolutely impossible with these systems. You can cut aluminum quite well. All the copper based alloys, silver alloys and gold are possible but not easy. Don't cut galvanized steel - burning zinc fumes are deadly.

2. Blades are typically broken if the coil is not held just so. Don't over tighten the screws on the hold down plate - if you do the plate will bow and not touch the coil for its entire length. You need to use your fingers to hold the plate down more firmly right around where the blade is cutting the coil - with a short coil system (4-5") you may not need to do this but, with any of the longer coil systems the hold down needs the help of your fingers to work properly.

3. If the blade comes loose at all, the blade will explode. The arbors that hold the blade typically have tiny little screws. If you get the jumpringer replacement arbor that we sell, we use a much larger hex head bolt and don't use that little pin that fits in the slot on the blade.

4. All jumpringer type tools turn WAY TO FAST. Try to run as slow as possible - this is easier with a dial type speed control on your Foredom than with the foot pedal control. A Foredom does not have any power at appropriate speeds so you need to make the most of a poor set-up. You also need to move the jumpringer along the coil only as fast as it wants to go - use very little forward pressure. Focus on holding the cutting head down and keeping it stable - gently ease it along the coil. You know you are going at the right speed when you aren't burning the lube. When you see the lube smoke slow down. Its not easy but its possible.

5. When you get to the end of the coil the blade will likely grab, mangling a few rings and spraying them around the room. If you are cutting cheap metal, try to stop before getting to the end. You can do this by putting a stop in the right place and laying your coil right to the end of the groove each time (starting point of the coil is much less important). If you are cutting expensive metal, make a coil of cheap metal in a contrasting color and put a 1/2" piece of the cheap coil bumped tight against the expensive coil. Another precious metal tip is to lay a large sheet of paper down so you can collect the metal dust that sprays every where.

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Please feel free to delete, move, or disregard the following as it actually has little to do with the original topic other than being inspired by it.

I find it interesting you have taken the time to pass on some knowledge concerning a tool like the Koil Kutter that, as you say, you do not sell.

I am very interested however on what recommendations, instructions, or perhaps even products you would consider offering. Starting with the available arbors and blades you do sell. I have seen strikingly little info or guidance that might encourage me purchase such items other then perhaps to be used with products offered by other vendors. I am actually quite fond of giving you my money and would like to give you some more of it should you perhaps in the future have a suitable home cutting device I could purchase or perhaps have some detailed guidance on how to make use of the parts you offer to make one of my own(keeping in mind I am a horrible student).

I am just surprised at this point you allowing the most appealing option to be that I order a self contained unit from south of the border.

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What about the Ringinator EZ? It has solved most all the problems you mention. It can cut all metals, is liquid lubricated, and cuts most any size length/diameter of coil.

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We have sold the jumpringer in the past. We sold the All Metals Saw (AMS) and Jumpringer (same manufacturer) for a few years. I like the company (Ray Grossman) that makes these products and this is in no way a personal attack against the manuacturer. I get enough qustions about using the jumpringer (and we sell blades and improved replacement arbors).

The AMS was the best ring cutting tool that I have bought off the shelf and used. It has a few small problems and Ray Grossman discontinued the line while working on a new improved machine. The new improved machine came out and in my opinion is was a huge step back from the AMS. It was sold as the Jumpringer MKII - I have no idea if its still for sale now but it was literally a hand drill powered version of the Jumpringer (jumpringer uses a Foredom). I bought 3 jumpringer MKII's (one of each submodel) tried them out and was so disgusted by the performance that I never even offered them for sale. They are in my museum of machines should anyone want to see them.

Ringinator - I know little about it. I think the idea is good and I have no comment on the quality and useability of the tool. TRL would have been interested in exploring the idea of selling a ready to use Ringinator but there is one large problem - CSA/UL certification. I'd only want to sell a ready to use machine but its illegal for us to sell electrical equipment that is not UL or CSA approved. I've been on an engineering team for a very compliacted piece of electronic equipment and recall CSA certification cost the company $25,000 and 3-4 months work. I assume a motor with a switch would be easier to get certification for than a $250,000 ground base atmospheric Ozone measuring machine but I'm still scared off %29.gif

I have nothing against selling machines that allow people to make their own rings but I know that developing and making a machine for sale would HAVE to be a labor of love not a for profit venture. I'm quite confident that a part time job at McDonalds would be a more profitable use of my time.

My recommendation for someone who wants to saw cut rings.

1. Buy a lathe - used on ebay, cheap import, whatever anything sold as a lathe would work. The best (what we use) are precision tool room lathes - overkill but the best tool for the job.

2. Buy an off the shelf lubrication system. Mist lubrication is good, flood is ok but very messy

3. You could buy our arbor but heck you have a lathe make your own arbor - on the other hand it you have no machining experience you are better off buying the arbor - I have hundred of hours of playing with a lathe, experience with all the tooling and I certainly could not make an arbor as good as the ones we sell (made by a professional machine shop)

4. Now the hard part - holding the coils. I've tried a few methods and the best is the 2 plate system. TRL really should sell these. In any case securing the bottom plate to the cross slide of your lathe is the hard part. Our setup for this is done without concern for the budget and with a lot of concern for ease of ajustability. I'm not willing to share the design but you don't need (and likely don't want to pay for) a system as fancy as the one we use.

BTW we also have 2 custom saw cutting machines built from the ground up that are self feeding (i.e. the machine pushes the coil itself). I'm also not too exciting about shareing the designs for these machines but I will say that we require a new set of tooling for each size of coil we run.

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I do have 2 small lathes that I would sell. One is a Sherline type lathe (tiny - like 25 lbs), the other is a speed lathe type lathe (small - like 100 lbs). Pricing in around $200 each but not I'm not willing to convert them into ring cutting machines and sell them - way too much work :).

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Ringinator - I know little about it. I think the idea is good and I have no comment on the quality and useability of the tool. TRL would have been interested in exploring the idea of selling a ready to use Ringinator but there is one large problem - CSA/UL certification. I'd only want to sell a ready to use machine but its illegal for us to sell electrical equipment that is not UL or CSA approved. I've been on an engineering team for a very compliacted piece of electronic equipment and recall CSA certification cost the company $25,000 and 3-4 months work. I assume a motor with a switch would be easier to get certification for than a $250,000 ground base atmospheric Ozone measuring machine but I'm still scared off %29.gif

I think you're confusing it with something else. The Ringinator EZ uses a standard power drill that is provided by the customer. That is what makes it so versatile; almost any kind of drill can be used.

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Personally, I own the Ringinator EZ, I think it leaves much better cuts and no burrs than any of the rings that I have ever purchased from TRL. This isnt to bash TRL, because I do purchase supplies from you. Not everyone has room for a lathe and a entirely huge set up, nor the know how to assemble it all safely.

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Personally, I own the Ringinator EZ, I think it leaves much better cuts and no burrs than any of the rings that I have ever purchased from TRL. This isnt to bash TRL, because I do purchase supplies from you. Not everyone has room for a lathe and a entirely huge set up, nor the know how to assemble it all safely.

I bought some rings recently from a guy who claims to be using one (I was desperate and couldn't wait for shipping from TRL and he was one state over) I ordered a small pack first(100rings to compare size and quality and they were great which I received in 2 days) so I PLaced a bigger order of several thousand(also received in 2 days) and almost every ring I received had burrs( sharp scratchy ones) and he claimed to have tumbled and polished them so they were shiny but since I was using the for a bikini top for I had to deburr them all which is kind of time consuming without a tumble. (guess that may have to be my next major purchase). never had to do that with TRL even when buying machine cut rings. maybe you have better blades or something. or I should have complained to him...they were bright aluminum 14g 5/16 or what he was selling as 12g 5/16th.

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...and almost every ring I received had burrs( sharp scratchy ones)...they were bright aluminum 14g 5/16.

The only time I have experienced a bur like that on aluminum is when I am using a really worn out blade. I tumble all my rings in rice and I never have any bur issues. I can only guess he was using a worn out blade on that batch.

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I bought some rings recently from a guy who claims to be using one (I was desperate and couldn't wait for shipping from TRL and he was one state over) I ordered a small pack first(100rings to compare size and quality and they were great which I received in 2 days) so I PLaced a bigger order of several thousand(also received in 2 days) and almost every ring I received had burrs( sharp scratchy ones) and he claimed to have tumbled and polished them so they were shiny but since I was using the for a bikini top for I had to deburr them all which is kind of time consuming without a tumble. (guess that may have to be my next major purchase). never had to do that with TRL even when buying machine cut rings. maybe you have better blades or something. or I should have complained to him...they were bright aluminum 14g 5/16 or what he was selling as 12g 5/16th.

Calisandra, I suppose it is quite possible that the person you bought from also used his setup to cut other materials such as titanium or steel so it duled the blade and maybe he did not switch blades. When I use my Ringinator EZ I have a blade that I use solely for aluminum, and one for harder materials, I chack my blades teeth before each use and when they begin to wear out I change the blade and toss it in the trash. I could be wrong about the person you bought from, but in my own personal use, I have not had a single bur on any of the coils I have ever cut, but I am very picky on my blades.

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I change the blade and toss it in the trash. .

No, no ,no, don't do this, lol. Save em up and use Thurston's resharpening service. Its a good way to save about half off each blade. When they resharpen them you loose a little on the diameter, but since most rings except big ones need the guide propped up with washers its ok to loose a little on the diameter. If you won't save em, send them to me. I'll pay for the shipping. lol.

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