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Terminology Question

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Hi guys,

I was showing my mom an IR bracelet that I'm making for a friend, and she asked me why it's called "inverted". I went and looked at Roundmaille, and stared at my bracelet, to try and explain it... but, I have no idea why xD

Did a little googling, didn't come up with anything, so thought maybe you guys could explain it to me?

Where does the "inverted" in Inverted Roundmaille come from? xD

Also, does anybody have any suggestions for clasps or closures to use with IR? I'm baffled for ideas, this triangle thing is...awkward...

Edited by sugarnspike613

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I just finished making a CIR wallet chain, and what I did was I all but folded the third ring down, and catch it with an open ring that went through the other two. I'll put up a picture of this when I get home.

EDIT:

Here is the picture I talked about.

post-6142-0-65543800-1323186457_thumb.jpg

Edited by j_betts

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I just finished making a CIR wallet chain, and what I did was I all but folded the third ring down, and catch it with an open ring that went through the other two. I'll put up a picture of this when I get home.

Thanks! Looking forward to seeing =)

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The difference between Roundmaille and Inverted Roundmaille is how the rings are put together (obviously...). Regular roundmaille is taking a this sheet of E4-1 and stitching both sides together, while Inverted Roundmaille, you flip the rings of the next row up, giving a different pattern.

Here's links to both, so you can see the difference.

Roundmaille: http://mailleartisans.org/weaves/weavedisplay.php?key=15

Inverted Roundmaille: http://mailleartisans.org/weaves/weavedisplay.php?key=110

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Gridlock (or corduroy) is sometimes referred to as inverted E4:1.

Inverted round uses 3 gridlock connections for each unit of the weave.

As the MAIL inverted round page also states, the grain for inverted round is also woven 90 degrees to the grain in roundmaille... which explains why they really cannot be compared too well visually, giving it a deceiving name.

Edited by TrenchCoatGuy

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The difference between Roundmaille and Inverted Roundmaille is how the rings are put together (obviously...). Regular roundmaille is taking a this sheet of E4-1 and stitching both sides together, while Inverted Roundmaille, you flip the rings of the next row up, giving a different pattern.

Here's links to both, so you can see the difference.

Roundmaille: http://mailleartisan...play.php?key=15

Inverted Roundmaille: http://mailleartisan...lay.php?key=110

Round looks like 6 sided box to me.

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Round looks like 6 sided box to me.

It's actually only 3 rings per row, which would make it 3-sided. However, with the overlap it does look 6-sided. It took me a minute of looking to figure it out.

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Hi guys,

I was showing my mom an IR bracelet that I'm making for a friend, and she asked me why it's called "inverted". I went and looked at Roundmaille, and stared at my bracelet, to try and explain it... but, I have no idea why xD

Did a little googling, didn't come up with anything, so thought maybe you guys could explain it to me?

Where does the "inverted" in Inverted Roundmaille come from? xD

Also, does anybody have any suggestions for clasps or closures to use with IR? I'm baffled for ideas, this triangle thing is...awkward...

For the last part, I've used http://www.mailleartisans.org/articles/articledisplay.cgi?key=11046 It was somewhat difficult to get the hang of, but it works rather well.

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Mdewaddic - Isn't MAIL such a fantastic site? I found that the other day, and thought it was an absolutely gorgeous solution.

My only two problems were that I can't get ahold of roundnose pliers easily, and I couldn't find 16g aluminum wire. I found 20g, and was going to settle for that.

NetStormer - Thank you, thank you, thank you! That's a brilliant solution! I was looking for something like that, too, a way to finish with rings.

On the note of the weave names, I had seen what the two look like, but couldn't really understand how they compared, aside from being round. I just couldn't figure out where the "inverted" came from, because I don't feel like there's anything inverted in that weave - there's nothing that seems to be "backwards" about it *shrug* Perhaps I need to go and look at the actual definition of "inverted" again.

Edited by sugarnspike613

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So, this was a big learning experience for me.

At the end of the day, I have an Inverted Round bracelet made with 1/4" 16swg AA in black, turquoise and green, with two handmade findings based on the article Mdewaddic linked.

The findings were not easy, I got really frustrated, and they never came out as nicely as they could've. I didn't have all night to spend practicing, I have to get the gift to the person it's for tomorrow.

Next time, I'm not touching IR unless I have some EPDM rings xD At least that way I can just close the thing and it'll had some stretch!

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So, this was a big learning experience for me.

At the end of the day, I have an Inverted Round bracelet made with 1/4" 16swg AA in black, turquoise and green, with two handmade findings based on the article Mdewaddic linked.

The findings were not easy, I got really frustrated, and they never came out as nicely as they could've. I didn't have all night to spend practicing, I have to get the gift to the person it's for tomorrow.

Next time, I'm not touching IR unless I have some EPDM rings xD At least that way I can just close the thing and it'll had some stretch!

Yeah, I used 20 gauge stainless steel for the ones I made to finish off a necklace. It took about six tries and I still wasn't 100% satisfied, but it works and I got to learn something new, so it was fine.

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Here's yet another way to finish roundmaille:

http://mailmaker.tripod.com/roundend.jpg

I like it because it does not break the pattern of the weave at the end as much as Pirsig's Bridge, and it just uses one ring and whatever type of clasp rather than the somewhat complicated (and difficult to make with hard wire like stainless and titanium) piece in the "Finishing Triplicate Chain Weaves" article.

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Here's yet another way to finish roundmaille:

http://mailmaker.tri...om/roundend.jpg

I like it because it does not break the pattern of the weave at the end as much as Pirsig's Bridge, and it just uses one ring and whatever type of clasp rather than the somewhat complicated (and difficult to make with hard wire like stainless and titanium) piece in the "Finishing Triplicate Chain Weaves" article.

It's a little hard for me to see how that one works. Do you just leave off one of the rings of the weave and then put a single ring through, or what?

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It's a little hard for me to see how that one works. Do you just leave off one of the rings of the weave and then put a single ring through, or what?

To me it looks like you flip the end rings backwards, then overlap two of them and end with one ring. I don't know if I explained that well, but it looks rather brilliant.

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Oh, okay, yeah. That's a decent explanation. I'll have to dig out a piece of roundmaille when I get home and see if I can visually replicate that ending. Thanks.

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To me it looks like you flip the end rings backwards, then overlap two of them and end with one ring. I don't know if I explained that well, but it looks rather brilliant.

yeah, I think thats it. I'll try to elaborate... in roundmaille there are two sorts of ends that might end up on the end of a chain - one of them has the last three rings on the end of the chain in a way to that they angle out from the center and out from the end of the chain (like this the end of the chain will at first look more like a hollow tupe); the other has the last three rings angling out from the end of the chain and angling in towards the center. The first way is such that the end of the chain is stable but those three end rings flop around a lot. With the second way the end is unstable in can unfold start to become recognizable as Inverted Round.

The ending I showed above works with the later unstable sort of end.

-Fold the rings back into the roundmaille form rather than a sort of budding inverted round.

-Then sort of squish the end with your fingers until two of the three formerly unstable rings overlap in the end of the chain.

-If you stare at it for a bit (and maybe fumble around with it some more) then those last three rings should start to look like a partial (3/5ths actually - a "fivelet" that is lacking the central ring through which four others should)..... ehh, screw stupid descpriptions... here's some pictures and a quick and crappy html page that should give the idea.

http://mailmaker.tripod.com/roundend.html

there's the pic that I showed above, and four others. Two of them are just copies of the other two, with red lines added to show how to thread the end ring through. One is a pic of the end held so the last rings are stable, then a pic of it squozen so two of the rings overlap. Out of the two pics with red lines, the squished one is probably best to look at first. I put the red line in the un-squished one too because it can be hard to see where it goes in the squished one, and I found it easier to follow with the line in both pictures.

I may get better pics with the better camera sometime to replace the ones I took with my phone.

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Oh, okay, yeah. That's a decent explanation. I'll have to dig out a piece of roundmaille when I get home and see if I can visually replicate that ending. Thanks.

If you can figure it out, I'd dig a tutorial!

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