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Alianhor

Rings cutting

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Since the beginning of my chainmail activity, I always worked with precut rings. I bought it from TRL part of the time and had it cut by someone who can not do it anymore the rest of the time.

Things change and I am now thinking about trying to cut my own rings. If I was rich enough I would probably give a try to the ringinator EZ but that being too expensive for me I think about trying to cut them with my small hands and a jeweller saw. I guess this solution takes a lot of time but I think I will enjoy it anyway and it is the less expensive I found.

TRL has got the wire, the mandrels, the jeweller saw but nothing to hold the coil. I had a look about the existing solution across the web and the one I found the most interesting is visible here :

http://www.paintingwithfireartwear.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=8&products_id=225

Questions are :

- Has anybody here tried such a solution and is it good ?

- Is there a better way to do it (any ideas welcome) ?

- Are the cuts nice enough with a jeweller saw ?

- Is it really possible to cut stainless steel with that ?

- And what about sterling silver ? I do not want damaged rings.

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I have only ever pinch cut rings so my opinion may not be useful. That said, it appears the only thing holding the coil in place is the saw blade. I don't see anything to keep the saw blade from moving side to side before enough of a notch is made to keep it in place. In my opinion, this could make for some messy cuts/marred rings.

Just my two rings worth from a purely theoretically view.

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I recently was shopping for new pliers and stumbled across several specialty pliers during the process. One of them was called a "coil cutting plier". They aren't going to allow you to cut nearly as many rings at a time, but solve the problem of how to hold on to them while trying to cut them. If you try googling "coil cutting pliers", or "jump ring cutting pliers", should lead you in the right direction.

I even stumbled on a link with a video 'how-to'; see http://www.contenti....rs/370-382.html I can't vouch for them personally, but the video makes it look easy enough. Seems they might only work for smaller size diameter rings, however...

Good luck!

Edited by madd-vyking

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I was cutting some 9 ga 1inch ID stainless steel rings for a dog collar for a Great Dane and I found that a bench vice worked great for holding the coil as I cut. I did not want to scratch the rings so I painted the vice with multiple layers of Plasti-dip then clamped the coil in the vice and sawed away. the 9ga wire took a while to saw through, but it held the rings until I opened the vice.

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I don't see anything to keep the saw blade from moving side to side before enough of a notch is made to keep it in place. In my opinion, this could make for some messy cuts/marred rings.

It seems the good way to use it is to put the saw blade in the middle of the coil and then cut the downside of the rings. That way it seems to me that the coil should not move a lot due to the "V" shape and the saw keeping it down. If it still moves too much I think I could make the slot for the saw a bit deeper on the front side and hold the saw in a more vertical position.

I recently was shopping for new pliers and stumbled across several specialty pliers during the process. One of them was called a "coil cutting plier".

I had this one on my list but trying to imagine using it seemed to me a bit of a challenge. You have to hold the plier in your left hand and the saw in the right. If you move the left hand while cutting I guess the cuts will not be wonderful. If you try the move, you will see that in this position it is very difficult to keep the left hand really still while sawing and very difficult also to be precise.

I have seen also this one : http://www.flickr.co...lry/2691039725/ but the problem seems the same you have to hold the acrylic part firmly with your left hand while cutting.

I was cutting some 9 ga 1inch ID stainless steel rings

I use mostly 20 / 22 ga wire and more copper, bronze and silver than steel. I am not sure it can be a solution in that case. Have you tried with smaller and softer rings ?

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If you're cutting mostly small, softer wires, you can always try a Koil Kutter (see http://www.longcanyon.com/Resources/KoilKutter.htm for some info) or something similar which you could use with a dremel or flex shaft. I kinda looked into that for a bit before finally deciding to just bite the bullet and buy a Ringinator. There are also DIY solutions like this one: http://www.mailleartisans.org/board/viewtopic.php?t=17113 from members of maille. Hope that helps a little maybe.

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There is a download from ArtJewelry's website that says you should use a piece of leather to hold down the coil as you cut it. I've tried it and it is OK, but I don't like to open/loosen the blade for every coil. And I find that with most by-hand cutting methods the last few rings are difficult to cut.

I made a slightly larger, boxy version that has a basket below with a mesh insert to catch the rings and let the cuttings drop out of the way. I cut the coil from the top not through the coil. I put dowels inside the coil to hold it and a wooden V (upside down, one end is beveled) on top to hold it as well. Didn't nick my fingers this last marathon cutting session the other day. (The nail is still short on my left index finger from earlier sessions.)

I was cutting the rings with flush cutters but it got tedious making the second cut to remove the burr. The jeweler's saw made it faster and the kerf is smaller, and in some cases, almost invisible.

But holding the dowel and V is hard on my hands and I'm considering getting an arbor and blade from the RingLord to make a mechanized cutter based on a neat design I found at MAIL that uses a V groove (aluminum) to hold the coil. I would have another wooden V with a closed end to hold the coils down firmly as I pushed them past the blade.

Coil Cutting Pliers - I'd seen a video and the rings seemed to move inside, possibly nicking the coil as well as cutting it.

The Delrin Cutter - Similar to what I am using, put it in a vice, it should work well.

The DIY solution - His setup is for one size chainmail rings for a hauberk, etc. He is using a continuously lubricating system to keep the blade cool while cutting long coils (2-3 foot or longer).

I've seen a version of a vice made of wood with a v-groove going down the length to hold the coil. I made it but my grooves were hand chiseled, not even, the coils wobble and it needed to be opened every so often to remove cut rings.

David

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