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lordmcfuzz

Looking for suggestions on power coiling and cutting setups

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If you don't know already, I coil and cut my aluminum rings all by hand. Well I am looking into options to do one or both with some sort of power setup(I would favor a power coiling over cutting if I had to choose).

I'm interested into getting to know what others are doing and how they got set up and any suggestions they have for me.

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Keep in mind that a drill and a leather glove is still pretty much the fastest way to coil until you get into really costly industrial machines. Jigs do make it easier to but that's at the expense of speed. Unless you're making massive amounts of rings I find it better to just put in the extra effort and save some time.

Saw cutting aluminum, on the other hand, will save you time and effort plus you get nicer looking rings out of the deal. I'd recommend using the headstock of a mini lathe to build one.

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Keep in mind that a drill and a leather glove is still pretty much the fastest way to coil until you get into really costly industrial machines. Jigs do make it easier to but that's at the expense of speed. Unless you're making massive amounts of rings I find it better to just put in the extra effort and save some time.

Except if you, y'know, have arthritis in your hands and you get tired after making three coils. :P And then there's always danger from whipback (OUCH!) or getting your glove caught between the wire and the mandrel...

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Keep in mind that a drill and a leather glove is still pretty much the fastest way to coil until you get into really costly industrial machines. Jigs do make it easier to but that's at the expense of speed. Unless you're making massive amounts of rings I find it better to just put in the extra effort and save some time.

Saw cutting aluminum, on the other hand, will save you time and effort plus you get nicer looking rings out of the deal. I'd recommend using the headstock of a mini lathe to build one.

I hand saw my rings already. From what I think I cut like ~200-400 rings an hour. From spool to weave I am averaging ~70-80 rings an hour(based off my last large project).

Except if you, y'know, have arthritis in your hands and you get tired after making three coils. :P And then there's always danger from whipback (OUCH!) or getting your glove caught between the wire and the mandrel...

I have been thinking about just getting a drill and doing it. I coiled probably about 7 coils last night(~125-150 rings per coil)(2.5 arm spans, so around 15 feet) and my thumb is pretty raw even with a glove. I have been thinkging of creating some sort of notched block to help me out with it. The glove takes most of the danger away from whip back(at le, the block would even help prevent any accidents.

Edited by lordmcfuzz

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I've gotten some pretty ouchy whip back even with a glove (yes, I'm still coiling with a drill and glove myself. I'm working on an hand's free method). I have heard of others somehow using a strip of leather to do it so that they don't have the possibility of getting a glove caught in the apparatus...but I haven't figured out how to do that and just keep on keepin' on.

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See my reply over on M.A.I.L. to you there. Like Jax, I hate trying to tension my wire with a gloved hand, for all the reasons he gave and which you notice -- it's a pain. Search either this site or the other on the searchterm "GROPP" and you'll see all of my fulminations about it -- I believe the glove way to be the dumb way. Guys who go mixing gloves with rotating machinery get their fingers eaten and have to eat their lunch with hooks.

Steel wire gets more vicious than aluminum wire does -- more springback, more energy stored up before whipping you bloody. Don't get me started on powerful drills getting you wrapped up in your work and dislocating your fingers. Those half-inch Milwaukee mud-mixers'll really do ya a number. They're expensive overkill on jewelry aluminum wire anyway.

For a hand-guide-only method, I prefer the use of the handheld feed block: a little scrap of wood or wooden dowel like broomstick, long enough to grasp in your hand (4-5"), with a hole drilled transversely across through its center to pass the wire through. You put the wire through the hole, then anchor the wire end to the mandrel for uptake. Hold the feed block in your feeding hand, letting the wire pass between your fingers on the way, and run the power drill. The block replaces the glove and makes a guiding and tensioning tool for the wire -- and takes all the wear too. Saves on gloves. It's a good tool for snugging up gappy coils too, which is called for now and then until you get the knack of the thing.

Edited by Konstantin the Red

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Konsantin's jig is definitely one of the best; it's inexpensive, simple and relatively quick to use. If you're prone to repetitive stress injuries or working with thick springy wire it's a good idea to use it. Lordmcfuzz is coiling 16g or 18g aluminum, a normal healthy person should be able to go all day without fatigue or injury. There are just over 17,500 rings in his last project, that's about 30 36" coils, less than an hour's work without a jig.

In the last 18 years I've seen or done just about every stupid thing you can do with a drill and some wire, but I've never seen a permanent debilitating injury. It's all cuts, bruises and sprains which are negligible in my opinion. The injuries usually occur when someone doesn't use good quality gloves or uses one of those expensive overpowered drills. If anyone is using a big Milwaukee drill to coil with they should immediately sell it on e-bay and use the proceeds to buy more wire and a cheap no-name drill. Years of testing at TRL proved that those big expensive drills just don't last long enough to justify their cost and create a serious hazard to boot.

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And the eyescrew powerwinding jig ain't even mine; I got the idea from The Chain Maille Board, back when Charles Gragg still had a going concern and a site. Worked so well I drew a pic that's posted in the Library: Gallery: Tools part of M.A.I.L.'s site, and haven't looked for a better home system. The one upgrade it could seriously want is wire feed from reels or a wire-jenny, but that kind of feed setup is for somebody who makes dozens of large mail articles a year.

There are a couple-three-dozen variations on the hole-and-holder kind of hands-free wire feed. Closed-up block that surrounds the whole work while it's being done, a metal bracket bent to present the feed hole and hold the mandrel's turning in a U shape so it doesn't skitter, same shape bent out of small-diameter steel rod, two staples in the wood chunk if you haven't got eyescrews, and you could cowboy it into shape with bent-over nails. And really that's just the beginning of the powerwinding wirebending gizmos you can whomp up in your basement. Even if you don't have one.

Edited by Konstantin the Red

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Hello,

I found this thread, while looking for a power coiling

and cutting solution for making jump rings.

What concerns the cutting, I think the ringinator is a good solution.

But is there any solution for the coiling that I can combine with

the Ringinator, so that I just have to feed a spool of wire and wait

until my rings are coiled and automatically cut?

Thanks for any Feedback.

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There are a few for machine cut rings.

They are larger industrial machines used by spring manufactures.

TRL was selling a few of their old machines a while back when they relocated production.

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