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Pepetools "JRM2" New Jump Ring Maker - Made In USA!

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How long are the madrels? What is the max weight that each mandrel can handle? What is the turn speed limit for the rig?

What other specs can you provide.

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How long are the madrels? What is the max weight that each mandrel can handle? What is the turn speed limit for the rig?

What other specs can you provide.

 

The JRM2 Kit includes 20 polished steel mandrels; 

  • 100mm (~3.9") long 
  • Diameter range | 2.5mm - 12mm | increasing by .5mm
  • Weight limit - Could you please clarify?
  • Speed limit - It is a hand powered crank. The self lubricating bronze Oilite bushing can withstand years of use and abuse. 

 

Please let me know if there are any other questions! I greatly appreciate the feedback.

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Weight limit. So If I am coiling a heavy metal, how much can the rig hold before snapping.

How long are the mandrels?

Does this rig allow for ease of saw cutting? I know the cylinder will allow for ease of snipping the wire via wire cutters.

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The rig retains similar functionality as the previous Jump Ring Maker. This instructional video will help clarify. Keep in mind, the video features our discontinued Jump Ring Maker.

 

 

 

 

Our new Jump Ring Maker - "JRM2", will be released to market in the coming weeks. 

 

 

The mandrels are approximately 3.9" (or 100mm) in length. I have to assume it would be almost impossible to break the mandrel  If one happens to break, let me know how it happened and I will send you a replacement.

 

Here is a simple drawing of a random mandrel to give you a better idea.

 

 

post-20184-0-83886300-1360216706_thumb.jpg

 

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So no direct functionality for ease of saw cutting.

Can one use a dowel instead of the standard mandrel? I ask this because on a dowel one can start a saw groove so that it is easier to saw cut the rings. I would recommend that for future mandrels as well.

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Lysenis:

 

Wood compresses too much to be an effective mandrel, besides not being nearly strong enough. A 2.5mm wood dowel, for instance, is barely bigger than a toothpick, and would likely break before you could even figure out how much it compressed. 

 

And in the video, you hook the rig right up to a dremel and cut away...

 

Pepe:

 

What are the improvements over the old model? Can you use any rotary tool with the saw jig or what do you recommend? Will the kit include everything you need to make the jump rings? (looks like you've got the crank and the mandrels, the saw blades and collet, the rotary tool cylinder thingy and the ring cutting jig...does it include the lubricant and do you need anything else?)

 

Looks like a pretty sweet overall system you've got there...

Edited by madd-vyking

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Even so I know many people who go out and buy dowels form places like home depo and the like. They get dowels at 3/16 size and greater and go to town.

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Using mandrels with a notch rather than a hole makes it a lot easier to take a coil off of a mandrel. With a notch you can slide the coil right off, but with a hole you need to snip the coil off of the mandrel.

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Using mandrels with a notch rather than a hole makes it a lot easier to take a coil off of a mandrel. With a notch you can slide the coil right off, but with a hole you need to snip the coil off of the mandrel.

Good point Zero! I just dont have enough experience in making my own rings to be able to put that together. . . Logi is sound though imho.

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That is true. 100mm is only 10cm so . . . yea. . . does not seem like many rigs at all. 1.6mm wire means less than 100 at a time. . . that is TIME consuming. . .

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I don't know, it takes about all of about five minutes to demonstrate how to use it in a video--if you weren't telling people how to use it seems you could crank out 100 rings or so in 2 minutes or less. (With the saw set up and etc...) That may be a long time if you need 25000 rings for a project, but for small run jewelry stuff like I do, typically in 18g-22g, I'd think that'd be pretty alright.

 

I think to tool something at least five times longer--20 mandrels--five times as long; you'd need a stabilizer at the opposite end from the crank for the longer mandrels; and then a saw jig five times as long---that would increase the price significantly, I'd think.

 

It may not be for everybody, but I'd think as an all in one package for a small scale jeweler, not a bad deal.

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I am with Plutonium on this one. Madd is also correct, great in situations where you need small amounts but not so good for bigger projects. That makes me wonder if it is right for me then. . . I mean it can be added on to but I am not sure what the weight limit is. . .

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Welcome Pepe tools.    

 

First a few words on Pepe tools - I know they've been around for a long time and have a reputation for making a high quality tool.  We've never done business with them but they do have a good reputation in the jeweler's community.

 

Now a few words on Jumpring type systems.  We have sold jumpring type systems in the past.  We stopped selling them as we did not feel these tools were a good fit for out customers - i.e people who use a lo of jumprings.

 

Mostly my experience is with the longer jumpringer that cuts a 12" coil.   I have used the 4" system like Pepe is selling and its much easier to use then the 12" system but still has the same problems.  Note that my experience is also with the ABSOLUTE BEST available Foredom - this 1/3 HP foredom gave me way more power and speed control then you are likely to get with anything reasonably priced.

 

The motors used (i.e. foredom, dremel, etc) are way way too fast for ANY ring cutting - you are constantly fighting against the fundamental problem that the blade is spinning 10 to 100  time faster then it should be.  If I were to pick one RMP to do it all with a 1.25" blade I'd pick 300 RPM - the flexshafts are typically 30,000 but still have enough power at 5000-1000 RPM.  Because of this speed you can only cut soft metals - absolutely no steel, stainless, niobium, or titanium.  Even bronze is a bit tricky and there is often problems with enam. copper because of heat.  Cutting with this style of system is a stressful job that requires skill, experience and a little luck.  Blades wear quickly due to the high temperatures and the high temperatures are because of the speed.  Despite a foredom being variable speed you lose power at low speed and even the low speeds are way to fast.

 

Jumpringer type systems typically destroy the last few rings in the coil.  When cutting expensive material I recommend butting a copper or aluminum bit of coil in the matching size at the end of the coil (and the beginning too sometimes).  this shortens the useable length by another 1/2 or so.

 

One small flaw with the Ray Grossman jumpringer that I'd be curious to know if Pepe fixed.... Its a mistake to drive the blade with a pin AND to clamp the blade with a Crappy little #6 flat head screw.  If the undersized screw strts to come lose (and there is a lot of vibration with this type of system so it will) then the pin continues to drive the lose blade and the blade explodes.  We replaced our arbors with a version with a: a slightly thicker shank (the OEM shanks often bent) , b: NO PIN to drive the blade, c: a #8 hex head machine screw to securely hold the blade with friction... and if it does slip it just slips instead of exploding.

 

Good flexshafts are expensive - I think mine was about $400.   I tried a $80 import once... it lasted a month or so.

 

Overall I think jumpringer type systems are best left to jewelers and chainmaillers who want to cut their own rings with a saw should buy or build a ringinator type system - note that I don't have a vested interest either way... wait a minute yes I do!  The more difficult it is you to cut your rings the more likely you buy rings!  Oh well :)

 

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That makes me wonder if it is right for me then. . . I mean it can be added on to but I am not sure what the weight limit is. . .

 

These are inherently sturdy just due to the simple design but they really aren't meant to be used for anything other than soft copper, silver or gold alloys. It's only made of aluminum so trying to wind thick or high tensile strength alloys on one of these is just asking for an injury or breakage. I'm especially leery since the product photo appears to be a 3D rendering rather than the actual machine.

 

The advantage of these types of systems is convenience for small jeweler's shops, anyone who makes chain mail is far better off with a set of 36" mandrels and an electric drill.

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A computer designed, gold plated, LASER cut, Al6V4Titanium beer can opener is still just an obsolete beer can opener.

  

I'm with Lorenzo on this one. Or to be realy cost effective, get a job and buy your links from Jon or someone else with an automatic spring coiler.

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Those are some nice renders. So David was set loose on a Solidworks station. I see had I taken his offer of free CAD rendering services he would have done a nice job for sure.

 

.uA6j3MP.png

Edited by Martin

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I'm with the rest of the crew on this one.  I'm using TRL's 18" mandrels and I wouldn't go any shorter than that, myself....although with my current setup, I couldn't really go longer than that either.  Hopefully sometime I'll be able to get some nice long mandrels and won't have to start coils as often.  If I wanted something that was only going to make 4" coils, I'd go get a set of transfer punches.

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Hi,

 

Will this new Jump Ring Maker cut through 16ga Bronze wire?  I have the old Pepetools Jump Ring Maker and it's served me well with cutting through copper, silver-plated, and silver wire, but I'm not having any luck with the 16 ga bronze wire.

 

 

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