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Julie5150

MAILLE FAQ - All you need to know and then some

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Thanks for the update. I guess I should start reading at the end.

You're welcome just trying to do my part and keep the help alive.

What AR works with what weaves?

http://www.chainmail.../weavechart.php

^^this^^

OK it has been added to my updated list unfortunately I can't update the original faq as it was created by some one else.

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Some of the more popular ones that you will see abbreviated are

  • Captive Inverted Round = CIR
  • European = E
  • Japanese = J
  • Full Persian = FP
  • Half Persian = HP
  • Interwoven = I
  • Inverted Round = IR
  • Jens Pind Linkage = JPL
Also following any of these may be a set of numbers such as E4-1 which stands for European 4 in 1.

The numbers may also be followed by the letter S and a number such as HP3-1S6 which stands for Half Persian 3 in 1 Sheet 6.

I am sure there are others but those are the ones I can think of right now hope that helps some.

Thanks for putting this out there. Now if there was only a way to train the mind in memorizing these. Any suggestions?

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Memorizing the weaves or the name abbreviations? Either way, keep doing them and saying them and you'll memorize them. I'll be honest, there are times when, even if I've done a weave a thousand times, I will forget how to start it or some little step of it, so I consult my library of weave tutorials. :D

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I"ve been looking for hours for an answer to a question, but haven't even found a good place to ask. I'll try here, though it seems it hasn't been used for a year.

 

I have recently begun using 16 gauge rings, and the pliers I have do not seem strong enough. They flex when I'm closing the rings, almost seem as though the handles will bend. Are there any guidlines for plier sizes for different ring gauges and sizes?

 

Also, yes, an update would be appreciated ... So many links from other RingLord pages also don't work for me.  Derakon's "we've moved" link, for instance, leads to a server not found page, and there are no pictures on the site that actually loads. I'm thinking it might be my computer.

 

Thanks

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I have recently begun using 16 gauge rings, and the pliers I have do not seem strong enough. They flex when I'm closing the rings, almost seem as though the handles will bend. Are there any guidlines for plier sizes for different ring gauges and sizes?

 

---------------------------

What kind of pliers are you using now?  What metal are the rings in question? Also, ring size can play a role in how hard a rings is to close.

 

I have found that standard pliers of good quality will work just fine on 16 gauge galvanized and stainless.  I recommend Craftsman if you can get them. I think they still have their lifetime guarantee.  If it breaks, they replace it, simple.

 

If you are on a tighter budget, and if there is one near you, Harbor Freight carries some good strong pliers.  I have a couple pairs of theirs that I have been using on 16 gauge galvy for at least 4 years now, and the are holding up beautifully.

 

Basically any good solid pliers should work, but using smaller lighter craft pliers is a bad idea with heavy gauge, or higher tensile strength metals.

 

I hope this helps!

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Thanks, and sorry, I should have said I'm using bronze rings, 5.6mm ID. I have 6 inch chain nose pliers, one straight pair from TRL, and two, one straight and one curved, from Beadalon...I got those from a Michaels store, where they only came in a set. Perhaps the TRL pair is stronger, but they are older, and have a smooth rubber covering on the handles...it slips, and has no cushioning, so I tend to use the others more.

 

I see you do not recommend the kind I'm using (I wouldn't, either! LOL), but I don't see how I could use regular pliers, because the nose is so fat, and they have teeth. I've seen the modified ones made by someone here, but don't know how to do that. I have a large bench grinder, but don't know if that is how he did it. It would certainly be a lot of material to remove by grinding alone.

 

 

What kind of pliers are you using now?  What metal are the rings in question? Also, ring size can play a role in how hard a rings is to close.
 
I have found that standard pliers of good quality will work just fine on 16 gauge galvanized and stainless.
 

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In the past I have used metal files and a dremmel type tool to sand down the teeth on larger pliers.

As for the grips just about anyone that does chainmail often chooses to add material to pad the grips.

Currently vet wrap from agracultural shops like tractor supply seam to be popular. Though tubing or cloth can also be applied.

Hockey tape and electrical tape tends to make everything sticky with excess adhesive.

I find it helpful to actually handle tools before purchasing hand sizes and how you hold the pliers makes a difference.

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Maybe getting a sturdier pair of chain- or needle-nose and wrapping the jaws with duct or Gorilla tape will cushion the teen.  It needs to be replaced regularly, but it works pretty well.

 

The Beadalons are the wrong pliers for working with anything over 18 gauge (IMHO). They're good pliers for light work, but for heavy work, they are just not the thing.

 

If you can find them, and they are out there for as little as $15, the Aven 103chain nose ego smooth jaw pliers have a comfy grip and are pretty sturdy.  My only problem with them is they are short enough that getting good leverage for heavier, sturdier rings can be difficult, but they should work for what you're doing.

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On 02/25/2018 at 2:54 PM, Jfeeney52 said:

My cousin wants me to make him a shirt that's the same size as what they used in medieval times. Does anyone know what that size is or know somewhere I can look for it?

Well, both your cousin and you need to know more about shirts, if that's how he put it.

To fit your cousin, you'll want a shirt that is about as big around at the waist as about his waistline measurement plus as much as, maybe less than, twelve inches with the mail pulled out to max stretch.  Up at the rather thicker chest, adding up to that chest measurement too, plus another ten inches, also with the mail fully stretched out.  This gives room for him to move and to wear something padded under that mail.

Short sleeved or long depends on what middle ages era you two settle on.  Even unto the Renaissance, technically.  By then, mail was no longer the star of the military show, though it was still in use armoring places plate pieces just couldn't manage, like the armpits, and as part of a defense in depth about the hips, almost like a mail petticoat beneath plate taces and tassets.  Armoring hip joints and being flexible too is hard.  The mounted man could use his saddle as thigh, hip, and 'nad protection; leg infantry had to take their chances that nobody would get a good stab up their skirts.  Ouch.

The medieval history of mailshirts is mostly one of growth, from the short and vest-like byrnie of Beowulf's Dark Age time, to an unknown period where mailshirts may have covered more, to the emergence of the knee length, split skirted knightly hauberk from about the latest tenth century, and pictured in the eleventh-century Bayeux Tapestry, with round shields, long teardrop shields, and conical helmets with nasals.  After this, hauberks got bigger, until by mid thirteenth century the hauberk had mitts built into its sleeves and a coif of mail attached at the neckhole.

I like to speak of the 13th-c. 'berk as armoring the warrior aristocrat from kneecaps to bald spot in one single piece of equipment.  He'd wear a helm over that coif.  By then he was also additionally armoring his torso with a body defense of smallish plates, more or less overlapping.  But NOT AT ALL like the playing-card hauberks in Braveheart.  Torso only.

It's also pretty heavy by then, and really better for a mounted warrior with a horse to carry him and his gear across the battlefield, fighting with a lance.  That's expensive, what with everything from feeding the horse to breaking lances -- they were expendable.

Plate armor was developing during the fourteenth, and the overall hauberk shrank to the short-sleeved, mid-thigh haburgeon for about the last thirty years of the fourteenth century -- saving weight.  The fourteenth century came in with mail 'berk and chausses overall, plus a barrel-helm, and went out with nearly complete armour of plate, with only a smallish amount of mail visible on the up-to-date knight.

Thus, history:  a tale of little shirts and big shirts.  Here's an excellent page for the craft of it:  Everything about weaving E4-1 mail is chimp simple as mail goes.  These instructions produce a tailored shirt that moves with you and doesn't much try to slide down through your cinch belt as you move and fight -- you will use one.  Takes some of the weight.

https://web.archive.org/web/20160508055350/http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm

I'd download it into your computer.

Edited by Konstantin the Red

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