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magborg

Various weaved metals and how to clean the combination

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Hello Everyone

 

There are jewelry pieces out there that intertwine brass, bronze and copper with each other and or other metals like bright aluminum, stainless steel, sterling silver and so on. How are these finished jewelry pieces cleaned? For example, what happens to bright aluminum when using something like Brasso to clean a piece with brass rings and bright aluminum in it? Surely some of these chemicals that clean one metal can harm another, if not immediate then eventually?

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I made a piece for a friend, that used brass and bright aluminum. I cleaned it with regular toothpaste. It's mildly abrasive and there was no chemical reaction. The friend has continued to do the same, with no ill results to report.

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So Brass rings and Bright Aluminum from The Ring Lord can be cleaned with toothpaste and let us say a toothbrush and it is enough? If the brass has aged and tarnished for quite a while, this technique will still be enough when cleaning the entire piece? Any other techniques like my previous query using Brasso? I don't want to remove the Bright Aluminum finish as I know it is possible to do so. I am sure people who intertwine metals in their pieces have the experience and knowledge to consider how to affectively clean their pieces even after heavy tarnishing without negatively affecting the used metals.

 

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I can't speak to extreme extended use but it's been a year now, and my truck driver friend has had no bad results from this while wearing it on the job. For my part I didn't use a brush; just my fingers and then cleaning it off with warm water.

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A mild acid like lemon juice will de-tarnish copper and brass very quickly, and won't damage other metals. Baking soda cleans silver very well, and again won't harm other metals, so one or the other should work for a mixed piece. Stainless steel and anodized aluminum just need occasional washing with soap and water. I don't use bright aluminum, but I believe baking soda is the best cleaner for that too. Just avoid using any stronger cleaners, like metal polishes.

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I would like to know more about this as well. Particularly sterling and niobium. I can't tumble niobium... But I need to keep my sterling shiny!

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A mild acid like lemon juice will de-tarnish copper and brass very quickly, and won't damage other metals. Baking soda cleans silver very well, and again won't harm other metals, so one or the other should work for a mixed piece. Stainless steel and anodized aluminum just need occasional washing with soap and water. I don't use bright aluminum, but I believe baking soda is the best cleaner for that too. Just avoid using any stronger cleaners, like metal polishes.

Baking soda can etch aluminium, as might acids if left on for too long.

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Wow. I had the very same question regarding cleaning a sterling and niobium bracelet.

Person wanted to know whether the technique using aluminum foil plate with hot water and baking soda would damage the anodized niobium rings.

I'm not sure which would be the best cleaning tool: baking soda paste, toothpaste or the aluminum foil plate technique.

I was planning on experimenting with some ring combos but wonder about long term effects of repeated cleaning using any of these methods on anodized niobium.

Anyone with any experience with this?

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Thanks. That's what I need to do as I haven't found any information on this either.

Just curious if anyone has had any experience with anodized niobium getting darker or becoming duller?

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Apparently the foil technique makes the silver more porous and more prone to tarnish, this is what I have heard... But I never noticed a difference.

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I've made some Sterling and Blackened Niobium earrings which I just tumbled using a vibratory tumbler and crushed corn cob media. I tumbled them for about three hours and the Sterling is shiny and the Niobium does not appear to be any the worse for wear. 

 

I know the blackening is a different process than anodizing but thought I'd share.

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