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Sword practice exercises?

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hi, I'm hoping someone can point me in the right direction. When lord of the rings came out, I bought a replica sword with the intention of using it for practice/exercise. I know years ago there was a youtube video showing the correct sword parries and thrusts -- the same configuration that 'Boromir' calls out to the Hobbits in the movie when teaching them to use swords. I have googled for days, asked all my LotR friends and nobody can find it or any other 'real' resource that lists the actual sword movements. I would love to find something! I want to spend the winter using this as an indoor exercise to stay a little more fit than last winter ;) Any help would be great. 

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What type of sword?

The movements vary a bit depending on style.

A lot of it is foot work.

I33 is one of the earlier manuals, though capa ferro, George silver, and the other masters are usually more suited to lighter swords and one on one combat techniques.

There are a few groups like the SCA that use weapons to pratice and compete.

currently the SCA uses rattan for heavy combat a rapier combat with blunted weapons that meet the standards listed. The armoured combat league or the battle of the nations are much more aggressive.

Each group has their own rules and regulations.

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The course I took (and have signed up for again because I enjoy it and there is always something more to learn) tends to follow Hans Talhoffer's teachings for European swords. While I don't generally like to use Wikipedia as a resource, you can follow the reference links at the bottom for more information. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Talhoffer

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You may want to get a different sword for practice. Replicas are made to look pretty, not to withstand actual combat.

Absolutely right. Replicas are made only to be displayed, not for practice or even just learning the moves. Even if you are not hitting things, a replica sword is an accident waiting to happen.

 

This linked web page has some valid things to consider when choosing a sword and also explains why replicas are not what you want to be swinging around: http://www.sword-buyers-guide.com/buy-swords-online.html 

 

(Full disclosure: I have absolutely no affiliation with the owner of the web page nor have I purchased anything from them. I simply find some of their information helpful.)

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Try this channel, some good stuff in there but maybe not exactly what you're looking for.

 

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMUtS78ZxryOMRve8RkM0vcrIKPH3hGvW

While this doesn't take the place of proper training, it does appear to have good information for those who cannot find appropriate training nearby.

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Well, it all depends wether you want to learn real sword techniques, for public shows, or something like SCA, tournaments, etc.

 

What one usually sees during shows is very limited, because most original techniques are dangerous. For example thrusts normally would be used 40%-60% times in real sword fights, depending on sword and enemy type, adding grappling, half-sword and many other techniques.

However, thrusts and grappling is banned in most tournaments. By this standards, naturally elegant swordplay that requires agility and skill, turns into tournaments of "Me knight smash!"

 

However, if you want to learn real swordplay, try ARMA, AEMMA or similar societies. ARMA scholars try to re-discover old techniques, basing on old treaties, manuscripts, and trying it out.

 

You could use your sword for private training, provided it has proper dimensions - for short sword (often used with buckler) it`s around 90-110 cm, 900-1100 g weight. For longsword its 110-150 cm, 1200-1700 g weight. It could be different, if you have uncommon height, posture. For someone of 2 meters height, 120 kg weight, I`d recommend bigger swords ;>

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There's also that asian styles of sword fighting as well, I hold a second degree black belt in Japanese swordfighting (not kendo, which is just bashing away at each other with bamboo, although that's an option as well, much easier to find) and if you contact the All US Kendo Federation, they should be able to point you in the right direction to find someone to train with, just ask for Iaido.  You can youtube it as well, there's a ton of videos of people doing this stuff

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The sort of thing Boromir was coaching with was numbered "guards," "wards," or "lines of attack."  There are in modern fencing six of these, covering different parts of the man as a target, with the centerline of his shape being the dividing line between "outside line" and "inside line," which inside goes straight at his chest and belly, the outside towards back and ribs.

 

In the varied cutting with thrusting of Medieval longsword, four or five guards was the norm:  basically, what quarter of you the attack was coming from (upper right, upper left, lower right. lower left) and therefore what's handy to guard against it right there and just then, before you flow into a ready position to deal with his next try, which may be slow if he's really baffled or has put a foot wrong and gone off balance (exploit that), or it may be instant because he's got a plan and knows what to do.

 

http://www.thearma.org/essays/StancesIntro.htm#.V7XlgHzodUw

 

Every strike has its parry and every parry has its strike;  every strike is its parry and every parry is a strike.  Avoid thinking of the  two separately in tactics.  They are in essence one.

 

An essay about how the I.33 manuscript teaches those "wards:" https://hemastudy.wordpress.com/2015/07/14/7-wards/ -- I.33 counts seven wards.  Four wards or seven, it's all good.

 

Partners and instructors are even better, and they don't have to be anything fancy-pants or with impressive looking diplomas on the wall.  The Creative Anachronists, for instance, can do a *lot* of coaching just out there on the grassy -- dusty -- field.

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