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strhunter2

E4-1 and comission questions

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So I just received an email asking for me to make some chainmail that will go around the seat of a motorcycle sounds kinda cool to me (i should know more details by tmro)

But this got me over thinking about how much do i quote him, if i quote too high i might not get it, if i quote too low it may not be worth it. for my bracelets i do materials x2 +time =amount, but this would be the first commission piece ive done and im not sure how to price it


Which brings me to my next question of how many rings per inch for just standard E4-1 in 16g 5/16?

Thanks,
Strhunter2

PS hopefully this makes sense i have been up for 36hrs straight at the time of writing this

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On the store pages, the listing for each item will generally give rings/sq. ft. That will give you a good starting point for figurine out how much work you will be doing.

 

As for how much to charge for labor, there are threads here that cover that topic much better than I could in one post. :) I suggest finding and reading them for a good range of options/thoughts on the subject.

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I got $350 for a one-piece I did a few years ago for a friend and neighbor (R.I.P. JB99).  But, I did the rider portion of the seat in square wire dragon scale.  The pillon I did in HP3/1S6.  Only pic I could find (while still under construction) is attached. 

 

It'd really depend on what kind of bike you'd be making this for.  A sport bike has a tiny seat compared with a cruiser.  And if it's a cruiser, does it have dual seats or a one-piece? If you're just doing a simple E4/1 sheet, and only covering the 'seen' part of the seat, that's easy and quick (how fast can you make 2.5 to 3 square feet of E4/1).  If you were to recreate the seams in the original seat pattern by changing the bias, you can add more $$.  Wrap the maille under the seat, (lot more concerns) add more $$.  If the bike is already highly customized, you could probably get more.

 

A few things I learned from making a seat cover;

 

This will be out in the elements.  And it will under some odd stresses.  So, for it's strength, weather resistance and being as close to chrome as is easily available, stainless is the way to go (you didn't mention what material you were using).

 

Run your rows across the seat, so the rider has some grip.  No guy wants a painful slide up into his tank while under heavy breaking.

 

Sitting in the sun during the summer, the maille is going to hot.  Really hot.  Surface of the Sun, hot.  Advise your customer to carry a spray bottle full of water to cool it down before throwing a leg over (you can hear the water 'hiss' as it steams off the maille).

 

Maille is hell on the seat material underneath.  If he's got a leather seat, the leather will be reasonably tough.  But, the die, any conditioner and water proofing will wear.  If the seat is vinyl, the material will wear pretty quickly (vinyl seat coverings seem to be fairly thin).  The one I did I used a heavy pleather between the maille and original seat (another seat cover, if you will) and set grommets in the pleather to attach it to the maille under the seat.

 

A more finished, professional look is fitting the maille til you get under the seat.  If you've got a firm seat, like a Corbin, you can pattern the maille so it only goes to to the tins.  But when the foam is compressed on a soft seat, the maille will roll back from the tank a little bit and it will droop a little on the sides.

 

The downside of continuing the maille under the is, there WILL be contact between the maille and the painted tins - which means paint will get scratched.  How the bike is put together will determine how you account for this.  Maybe tool dip on the maille?  Maybe some leather?  Something else?  The bike will guide you to the answer you need.

post-2062-0-66819900-1414980371_thumb.jpg

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wow marky thats impressive, but the client doesnt want any thing that elaborate... yet

the clients bike is a 94 roadking single seat. all he wants is a triangle that is 21" long by 4-6" at the point in E6-1 that will hang from the back of the seat so i think it should be good for a first project

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I`d do that commision anyway. You learn, and by proving versality, you`ll make your market potentially larger.

 

What`s more - it`s just a bike seat. It` not very big, it`s just european 4-in-1.

 

Counting from the date of your first post here, you could have already made a dozen of such covers from some basic materials.

Also, you would have known all potential obstacles, and the exact time it took you.

 

I think you should do one of some cheap material just to test if it fits, and talk about price range while trying it on that seat. It should also be a narrow range after you finish doing cheap mockup.

 

Even if your client resigns, you will gain precious knowledge, doing a cheap aluminium mockup first costs you barely nothing in terms of material.

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i got that peice done, roughly 1800 rings, i charged him 100$ i think it was a bit on the low side, but he wants me to do more so thats good

this time he wants a rectangle thats 20 inches x 8 inches, so i did 50$ for materials then im thinking 100-150$ in labour

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