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Fungi

Book cover, and keeping maille in its "compressed" form

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I've started on a project for a book cover, and I would like to discuss ideas for a few things. I currently have a book cover made out of black fabric that will be around to book to protect it from the metal, and then I have the chainmail panels. One for the front, one for the back, and a simple weave that will go up the spine, with a satin ribbon for a bookmark.

 

I need to figure out a way to attach the chainmail to the cloth cover. I figured an easy way would be to sew the outside rings down (that plan will fail marvelously, explained in the next paragraph), possibly onto a separate sheet that I will then attach to the cover somehow. Other ideas are extremely welcome.

 

I realized this would work only if the chainmail was fully expanded / stretched. However to get it to lay as flat as possible, and to have minimal white space between the rings, the sheet will have to be in its most compressed form (see image link below). I can't just sew the edges because then the entire middle will flop out. Even if I sew random rings in the middle, it would have to be nearly every ring to prevent chaos. I was thinking of maybe running fishing line or a strong thread between the horizontal rows to keep the rings down, but I don't know yet how I'll attach that to the cover. Possibly leaving long tails along the edges and braiding them down. I could also get a sort of stretchy band woven vertically that would go around the entire front cover.

 

tl;dr - Are there any ideas for attaching chainmail to cloth? And any ideas for stopping maille from expanding?

 

https://i.imgur.com/gpi2qqm.jpg

 

Thank you all.

 

EDIT: Per Eric's suggestion, I ended up changing the piece to 6-in-1. It worked great, and even gave me extra room to work with now.

 

https://i.imgur.com/Q6NRlmc.jpg

Edited by Fungi

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Using a smaller AR should reduce the flop a bit.

You can also try using resin to encase the bottom half of the chainmail. It would form a solid panel.

There are a lot of resin or epoxy products.

The concern would be the resin chipping or cracking in use or yellowing over time.

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Thanks.

 

Using a smaller AR should reduce the flop a bit.

You can also try using resin to encase the bottom half of the chainmail. It would form a solid panel.
There are a lot of resin or epoxy products.
The concern would be the resin chipping or cracking in use or yellowing over time.

 

I was hoping to figure something out that would allow me to stick with the ring size. The epoxy is a strange idea, but I'll look into it more. That actually might be the fastest.

 

A denser weave, like European 6-1 or European 8-1 will be stiffer.  With rings near the minimum AR (~4.3 for E6-1 and ~5.8 for E8-1), they are nearly a solid sheet.

 

I feel silly for not thinking about that. Thanks - time to experiment!

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I'm a big fan of using various types of acrylic, epoxy, urethane or silicone with maille. I look at it as just another engineering material, pick the right adhesive for the properties you need.

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Another alternative to stiffness via just 6-in-1, 8-in-1, et cetera can be to make them King's Maille, or even tripled. Depended on your ring sizes it can become completely solid even around the edges.Here are some nice pictures from M.A.I.L.:

 

12-in-2: http://mailleartisans.org/weaves/weavedisplay.php?key=10

12-in-3: http://mailleartisans.org/weaves/weavedisplay.php?key=370

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A denser weave, like European 6-1 or European 8-1 will be stiffer.  With rings near the minimum AR (~4.3 for E6-1 and ~5.8 for E8-1), they are nearly a solid sheet.

 

Changing to 6-in-1 is what I ended up doing: https://i.imgur.com/Q6NRlmc.jpg

 

Worked great! The picture shows the piece in its most horizontally expanded form. I even have extra room to work with now, which is also great. Just need to fix the edges now that were messed up from the switch.

 

Thank you again.

 

 

Another alternative to stiffness via just 6-in-1, 8-in-1, et cetera can be to make them King's Maille, or even tripled. Depended on your ring sizes it can become completely solid even around the edges.Here are some nice pictures from M.A.I.L.:

 

12-in-2: http://mailleartisans.org/weaves/weavedisplay.php?key=10

12-in-3: http://mailleartisans.org/weaves/weavedisplay.php?key=370

 

Having never made anything that needed doubling or tripling, I can imagine it having good stiffness, but I don't suppose it would contract the original piece much?

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