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Zedzknight

Witcher 3 Ursine Armor

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It looks more like 4-1 to me. I took the image into gimp to try and get a closer look. Perhaps someone with younger eyes could chime in as well.

Also curious how easy it would be to walk around with just the opening in the front.

Good luck! Pictures as you make progress, please.

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Based on an estimate of Geralt's height being 5'-11", or 180 cm (source: https://steamcommunity.com/app/292030/discussions/0/483368433106517315/), each pixel translates into about .09". I measured 30 rows (15 one way, 15 the other) at 138 pixels, or about 12.4". Vertical spacing of rings between rows works out to about .41", so the ring ID needs to be at least that big. Appearance-wise, it looks to me like an aspect ratio in the 4-5 range.

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Make the mail parts primarily from E4-1, I always say -- best resiliency from the mail pretending it is elastic from the geometry of how the links join each other, hence best fitting to your contours.  E6-1 also ends up twice as heavy area for area; mighty few people have ever built a 6-1 shirt and then liked wearing the beast.  Inexperienced shirt makers tell me, "Oh, I don't mind the weight,"  until they try wearing the thing.  6-1 only for small, special, exposed places -- say about your throat in a collar and upon the points of your shoulders.  Which in this harness are covered perfectly well by his spaudlers.

The inertial effects of doubled mass will do cruel things to your poise at least.  From an armor point of view, I also see little reason to build a shirt of mail with a closure like that up the front, though it seems intended to make the shirt one with the ankle-length quilted jacket beneath it.  For a mailshirt, that is hardly necessary -- not even in Japan, where they on occasion rigged up just such gear, concealing it within the lining of an outer jacket to surprise ambushers.  Just because a 3-D artist who never bore armour in his life thinks this looks cool isn't a reason to actually follow his example.

For all the plate bits about his arms, lace these into the long quilted jacket at the tops of the armor plates, at least.  In suspending dense plate armor, made of steel after all, lacing up top (bootlace is ideal) holds the armor up, while leather straps and buckles around the arm hold it in.  You don't want it flapping; might get out of position in a fight, quite apart from being annoying.  It's a pity his armharness would let his elbows be smashed or cut through by opponents carrying swords like his.  He's buying trouble if there's nothing there!

(His armharness could be upgraded to like 15th-century German-type arm armor with one more piece -- an all-around (or 3/4 round) one-piece elbow like two cones intersecting at an angle, the elbow tied onto his sleeve there with points both above and below the elbow joint -- doesn't have to mesh/articulate with the vambrace, but just have room to ride over it.  Big tolerances IOW.  Then he can do blocks and guards with much more confidence.  Skillful warriors often get to be old men in a profession where many die as young men by such loadings of the dice, so don't be too proud.  Or too slavishly imitative.)

Armor-wise, you can quite do without the rings fastened to his heavy leather vest thing, which in itself has some protective value, particularly against arrows, and would have more if only it covered his belly as well as it does his back.  Rings like those basically do nothing -- you can see anyone hitting near them would try a thrust, especially if all he has is a little dagger -- right through that ring and through Our Hero.  Such a vest is a good way to tote those flat pouches of whatevers -- they look like pistol magazine pouches -- too, without use of bandolier or belt; the vest would get the job done.  I took his shoulder furry-bit for something styled like a heap of oak leaves at first.  The last bit of his first bear??

Edited by Konstantin the Red

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Need also to give some thought to preventing the top edge of the spaudler from jamming on the edge of the leather vest at the shoulder when he raises his arm.  Fighting with broadswords (Cold Steel makes some good ones for a couple-three hundred bucks in that size and shape (but not the goofy crossguard)) calls for the greatest possible easy arm mobility, including arms vertical.  See some European longsword fencing manuals now available.  They even have illos.  While arms seldom stick straight up, they do fly around all over the place, knuckles and elbows and sharp bit at  one end and a blunt heavy one on the other, using the length of the blade to arm-bar and lock somebody up so you can waste him quick.  Or beat his teeth in with the pommel or the ends of the crossguard, thereby illustrating the verb 'pummel.'  The entire length of a sword can really hurt a guy.

It may be that oblong thing up at each vest shoulder seam is something that flexes up, hingeing near the neck/collar line, and otherwise lying somewhat stiffly on the shoulder.  That kind of thing too is a frequent error from graphics kids drawing pix of armor.  Kind of like those dumb designs passing for armor in Warcraft.  One shudders.  In part, from laughing.

I like even fantasy armor to actually work, and move with you rather than tie you up, so you aren't fighting both your fiendish enemy and your half-ass gear.

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https://i.pinimg.com/736x/b7/ee/0f/b7ee0f05797e5780e0474212937764ce--th-century-sca-armor.jpg -- shows how the arm can bend

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/4c/91/70/4c917048deb4cd533faf366685b43881--dark-castle-knight-armor.jpg -- shows the two-intersecting-cones basic shape to advantage, also the laces that tie the thing in place on the sleeve.  Seems to go 3/4 around; inside of elbow is open.

German Gothic armor, mid- to latter 15th century.  A sure guide to its era is that he's wearing a sallet, the heyday of which was that century; it went out of use in the 16th, at least by the fashionable and well equipped.  Which meant it hung on a good while among the infantry, while the mounted knights went on to closehelmets.

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On 12/26/2017 at 0:08 AM, Konstantin the Red said:

Just because a 3-D artist who never bore armour in his life thinks this looks cool isn't a reason to actually follow his example.

Zedzknight is making this for cosplay. Replicating the artist's vision *is* the goal.
 

On 12/21/2017 at 2:33 AM, Zedzknight said:

Hey guys, im looking at making a cosplay and looking for some advice on ringsize and count for this armor. Im thinking its 6 in 1. 

I'd try E4-1 12g 3/8 or 12g 7/16, based on Zlosk's measurements and erring on the side of bigger, chunkier rings.

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Sorry for the long wait on the reply.

On 12/25/2017 at 11:52 PM, Konstantin the Red said:

I like even fantasy armor to actually work, and move with you rather than tie you up, so you aren't fighting both your fiendish enemy and your half-ass gear.

@Konstantin the Red Your Knowledge is greatly appreciated, and your input on making this actual functional armor was very intresting. Alas the actual goal of making this is to create a replication of the in game armor. I am not planning to run in to combat at a fair, Haha. Also just as further bit of info on this character, I think if you are a historical/fantasy person you may enjoy the book series this is based off called The Witcher by Andrzej Sapkowski. it follows Geralt of Rivia, a Witcher, a mutated supernautral monster hunter in a world of magic, beasts and politics. Its stupidly popular though Poland and Eastern Europe. 
 

@Eric So you think the 12g would be the way to go, On the topic of sizing, 3/8 or 7/16. I cant really judge that well but 3/8 would be a much "tighter weave" with less gap between rings and 7/16th would have a wider gap? the amount of rings roughly 10,000 like @kittensoft_chainmail suggested (sorry it wont link your name).

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On 1/18/2018 at 10:28 PM, Zedzknight said:

@Eric So you think the 12g would be the way to go, On the topic of sizing, 3/8 or 7/16. I cant really judge that well but 3/8 would be a much "tighter weave" with less gap between rings and 7/16th would have a wider gap? the amount of rings roughly 10,000 like @kittensoft_chainmail suggested (sorry it wont link your name).

Yeah, 3/8 12g will be a tighter weave than 7/16 12g.  The term is "Aspect Ratio" or AR. It's the ratio between the ring diameter and the wire diameter, and it tells you how tight or loose a particular weave will appear, regardless of ring size. On the TRL shopping site, you'll see the AR value listed with the other ring specs. The rings in your source image look to have an AR somewhere between 4 and 5.  If the lowermost belt is 1.25" to 1.5" wide, then the rings are about 3/8" to 7/16", and an AR of 4-5 puts you in the 14g - 12g range. This is just guessing based on personal experience. I'd recommend ordering a couple different sizes first and make a few test patches before putting in a large bulk order. If you want to skip that step, I'd vote for 12g 7/16".

How much coverage are you looking for? Are you going to overlap the maille in the front like the picture implies, or skip rings that would be covered?  Are you continuing the rings up underneath the leather harness up top? Skipping the hidden rings will shave a few thousand off the count.

Getting the maille to hang like that is going to be a challenge.  You'll need a trapezoidal panel to get the 12"-14" overlap up top and the 6"-8" gap at the bottom, and you're going to need to hide in a bunch of expansion to match the artists lines (the artist cheated :-) ). Also, if you use steel, the weight is going to make the skirt portion hug your legs. Aluminum or plastic rings have a better chance of flaring out with the jupon. How are you making the jupon?

Edited by Eric

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