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KrombopulosMichael

Padding under my maille armour

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When I asked my neighbor what he was doing that that buckskin he left outside for weeks, (tanning I assume?) he offered it to me. I told him I wouldn't know what to do with it! Later, I began to think about the possibilities of chainmaille application.

Would one weave it onto the inside of the maille somehow? I think that would be really neat.

 Or would it be more practical to simply make a leather vest to wear under the maille? 

Gambesons, right? Tell me something more, oh wise weavers!

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I wouldn't want to use it even for training with blunt weapons, because you need padding for that, but you could certainly use it to make an under-vest of some sort. That's assuming it's actually properly tanned. You might want to think about using it for something else though. Cutting into strips for ties, making medieval style boots, or the like.

As for a gambeson, I've been trying to think of a reasonable pattern with which to turn a moving blanket into one.

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3 hours ago, Rob MacLennan said:

As for a gambeson, I've been trying to think of a reasonable pattern with which to turn a moving blanket into one.

You want a reasonable gambeson, you don't footer around with moving blankets.   99% of moving blankets are stuffed with reclaimed polyester.  Hot & hotter. There may be a scant few all-cotton moving blankets available, but cotton is less than ideal once dampened:  the threads swell and the stuff seals up on you, and you get gently steamed while you fight.  Moving blankets are not intended to cope with a body that radiates its own heat.

Your reasonable gamby is of layers of discount linen, maybe with an outer shell of trop-weight wool.  Scratchbuild this beast as a quilted lasagna of fabric layers.  Interlap the edges that join, so your seams are not lumps, but very smooth.

Cut and style?  An arming-coat version of the "Pourpoint of Charles de Blois"  which itself was actually a late-14th-c. cotehardie with its sleeves made à grands assiètes, which afford a most remarkable degree of arm freedom.  Experience with patterns for this has taught us armour schleppers to modify the button details:  not running the sleeve button-rows up over the elbows, but stop them short of the elbow, for comfort and not catching on armor lames.  And plate armor guys, close up the front by lacing with long shoelace:  stronger than buttons and suited to the heavy loads late-fourteenth plate armor put upon the foundational garment.  You can find pattern graphics of it on the internet.

A maille guy can go simpler than this, so long as his gamby rides snug about waist and hip and a bit easier fitting about your upper chest, shoulders and upper arms, such that you can easily slide your bladed hand and fingers into it when you're wearing it -- the waist area being tighter.

Arm mobility with long and close-fitted sleeves is good for a gamby under mail; a shirt tries to pull the sleeves of the gamby beneath it into your armpits unless you can keep that from happening.

And there are details yet to come...

Edited by Konstantin the Red
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Not giving yourself heat exhaustion falls into the "Functional" column.  You wouldn't be sorry you did it that way.  You've heard this before:  it takes no more effort to do it right than to do it wrong.  There's a reason that comes  up; this is one of those cases.  Particularly as you're not looking for a deep lasagna of many  layers, but just four or so to give easy comfort.

Edited by Konstantin the Red

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I ultimately caved and went for a semi-custom gambeson from Armstreet, after hearing good things about them, rather than making my own. I'll concentrate on what I know how to do.

P3073872.JPG

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