Jump to content
wwecat

Aquaman Hauberk V3 assistance

Recommended Posts

Hey ya'll, so I've been working on and off on a short sleeve v neck hauberk for my Aquaman costume using the Ring Lord small scales. I've been working on and off because I keep hitting snags in my progress, and no one around me knows how to work with scales. I finally found someone who has some experience and who gave me advice, but they're out of town and can't help me at the moment. 

As it stands, I have part of the top ready to go. I've almost got the shoulders to lay flat like I want them to, but my first snag is that the head hole is just barely big enough for my head to slide through, and that is without closing anything. Attached are some pics if anyone knows how to solve this issue.

Right now I have the hauberk designed similar to a v neck t-shirt, with the back row on my neck and the deeper row on my chest. I don't want to put many latches or fasteners in it for appearance sake, but would be willing to do that if it is necessary. 

I look forward to hearing from y'all with any advice. I also need help with contractions and expansions (I have read the tutorial posted here, I still need help), but one step at a time. 

Peter David Aquaman pic.jpg

Scales back with arms down.jpg

Scales back with arms out.jpg

Scales front with arms down.jpg

Scales front with arms out.jpg

Shoulder goal.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you drop the middle row of scales at the front of the neck hole, for about 4 scales, you could stabilize the edges of that with rings and then add lacing. This would allow the neck hole to open slightly wider to make it easier to get on and off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/1/2018 at 10:41 PM, Rob MacLennan said:

If you drop the middle row of scales at the front of the neck hole, for about 4 scales, you could stabilize the edges of that with rings and then add lacing. This would allow the neck hole to open slightly wider to make it easier to get on and off.

I'm kind of hesitant to do that, because I want it all to be one piece. Is there a way to fix it without lace? E.x. would adding a row of scales on the chest near the shoulder, while keeping the neck hole the same make it bigger without affecting how the top lays? If not, where should the lace go? In the rings of the scale, or the rings of the chain?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The diamond shaped neck hole does not fit everyone well, myself included. I also worry your seams might be up a little too high, which can affect fit and flexibility down the road. (A little tough for me to judge though, since I'm looking on my phone...) You might try a hexagonal neck hole. You can split the shoulders in half, add some rows, and stitch them back together. That would enlarge the neck hole without widening it and lower those seams. The weight of full sleeves will prevent the scales along the sides of your neck from sticking up as well. 

A variation of the keyhole neck Rob mentioned is to set it off center and weave out a panel you hook to the other side. 

I hesitate to add this, but if you want a truly seamless look, you can do an expansion seam instead of a 45 degree seam. Instead of a smooth diagonal  row, you do steps: 2 scales down, 1 out, 2 down, 1 out on your panel edges and link them with expansions. This means the top of your two steps get linked together like a 45 degree seem, then you add in your expansion scale below. Then link the next step tops together like a 45 degree link, add the expansion scale, wash, rinse, repeat. This arrangement is tricky as far as seam placement goes and it helps to vary the ring sizes slightly to keep it laying flat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Paladin said:

The diamond shaped neck hole does not fit everyone well, myself included. I also worry your seams might be up a little too high, which can affect fit and flexibility down the road. (A little tough for me to judge though, since I'm looking on my phone...) You might try a hexagonal neck hole. You can split the shoulders in half, add some rows, and stitch them back together. That would enlarge the neck hole without widening it and lower those seams. The weight of full sleeves will prevent the scales along the sides of your neck from sticking up as well. 

A variation of the keyhole neck Rob mentioned is to set it off center and weave out a panel you hook to the other side. 

I hesitate to add this, but if you want a truly seamless look, you can do an expansion seam instead of a 45 degree seam. Instead of a smooth diagonal  row, you do steps: 2 scales down, 1 out, 2 down, 1 out on your panel edges and link them with expansions. This means the top of your two steps get linked together like a 45 degree seem, then you add in your expansion scale below. Then link the next step tops together like a 45 degree link, add the expansion scale, wash, rinse, repeat. This arrangement is tricky as far as seam placement goes and it helps to vary the ring sizes slightly to keep it laying flat. 

Right now, the back of the hauberk is one row shorter than the front, if I wanted to try the hexagon neck hole, do I need to make it the same size before changing the hole from a diamond? 

Also, when it comes to it, I still need help with expansions and contractions. There was a tutorial posted here a while ago, but it doesn’t explain in detail how to use them. Are there other sources of info avalible? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In that design the back should be somewhat wider than the front, in order to allow proper mobility for the arms. It does look like the side panels could stand to be a little wider too, which would open the neck up a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, so I took some measurements of my current progress and attached them below for review. I've marked how many scales are in each row and how long the rows are in inches. 

On 1/4/2018 at 0:58 AM, Paladin said:

The diamond shaped neck hole does not fit everyone well, myself included. I also worry your seams might be up a little too high, which can affect fit and flexibility down the road. (A little tough for me to judge though, since I'm looking on my phone...) You might try a hexagonal neck hole. You can split the shoulders in half, add some rows, and stitch them back together. That would enlarge the neck hole without widening it and lower those seams. The weight of full sleeves will prevent the scales along the sides of your neck from sticking up as well. 

On 1/5/2018 at 0:05 PM, Rob MacLennan said:

In that design the back should be somewhat wider than the front, in order to allow proper mobility for the arms. It does look like the side panels could stand to be a little wider too, which would open the neck up a bit.

Using this picture as reference, where would I move scales around to try a hexagon neck hole, and how many scales give or take should I try to put in each spot? I'm using the small scales. When I get the chance, I'll upload what the scales actually look like.

Scan01062018.jpg

Edited by wwecat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even though it sucks to tear out work, the simplest method is to separate your panels, then add perhaps two or three rows front and back to your shoulder panels. (You will have 5 - 7 scales along the sides of your neck at that point.) A good rule of thumb for 45 degree seams is to try to get them to follow a path from where your clavicle meets the deltoid muscles down to where the pectoral, biceps, and deltoid meet on the front. On the back: from where the trapezius meets the deltoid, down to where the latissimus dorsi, the triceps, and those little muscles (something terres? spinatus? I'm forgetting my artist's anatomy...) that sit on the scapula underneath. Add enough rows to the shoulder panels so the seams sit roughly along those lines. You may notice that they do not quite sit symmetrically front to back. That is ok. 

Reattach the panels with just a few rings, maybe every fourth or fifth scale on each seam, just enough to hold things together. Check the new fit. You may find that you have to fill in some of the neck hole on the front and back sides, depending on how much the new geometry dropped them. If you do have to fill in, that means your shoulder panels also have to be pulled in by an equal number of rows so they attach properly to the innermost rows. 

Once things feel like they are sitting comfortably, fill out your front and back panels far enough to attach five or six rows of scales under your arms. Make any further adjustments you need at this point. If there is an issue you will not have so much to tear out and redo. 

I've added four old pictures of when my first attempt was nearing 'completion' to the shared album below. Hopefully they help you out.

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipNUYvN7QgIhQMMt11pXLnE9A_Zq6CXMbhED42hAY3RWiiTsKgu3dMLvQ6wFGtgN7w?key=WkxaRHlyXzRYQVlUVk5hV09WdGI0M1VmU0tfWmlB

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've remade my first scale piece twice already and will be doing so for a third time, sometime soon to reprofile it and replace the aluminum rings with mild steel, by sections. It's not done until it's done. Doesn't help that I've dropped 40 pounds since I first made it.

I can't give better advice than Paladin already has.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also spent more time retailoring my first scale piece than I spent initially constructing it. Panels of scales just don't shape to the body like E4-1 does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×