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SterlingSerpent

seeking tutorials on chain mail clothing!!!

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Hello all! I have been trying to find good tutorials (videos, written instructions, books, etc) on how to put together pieces of clothing. I am confident in the actual weaves themselves and I need help learning the construction of beautiful chain mail garments! Any info or direction would be great thank you!

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1 minute ago, SterlingSerpent said:

Hello all! I have been trying to find good tutorials (videos, written instructions, books, etc) on how to put together pieces of clothing. I am confident in the actual weaves themselves and I need help learning the construction of beautiful chain mail garments! Any info or direction would be great thank you!

We sell tutorials on scalemail bras and maille bras. The hauberk and coif instructions are actually free - you can find them here

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/bxfag14l3whckb5/AAAT_Ds7m4Y0crVFChH5a62ka?dl=0

Those are all I know of that we sell or have.

Jodey

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Download that last one, the Trevorbarker -- it's about four pages, mostly typescript.

It's a tute that teaches how to reproduce a 15th-c. German mail shirt with long sleeves, about mid-thigh length.  Hamburg provenance, and unusually precisely dated and placed for mail -- around 1438 AD.

This is armor mail, a pullover thing like nearly all European mail shirts.  In that era, mail wasn't in the limelight any more; plate harness had taken over, and the sallet helmet was the latest German fashion in war hats -- the close-helmet was some decades off.  This shirt was probably intended for armored infantry combat, and may have had a minimum working life of fifty years -- perhaps even a hundred.  Mail wears like iron, you know!

It seems they made mailshirts pretty much like this shirt throughout the mail era in Europe.  The construction suggests that the shirt was assembled from premade rectangular pieces of mail, with tailoring things such as expansion/contraction arrays and individual expansion links having been inserted between the premade rectangles of plain-weave E4-1 mail.  The Trevor Barker recipe will run you through these things -- the handy thing about an expansion array or its mirror image upside-down brother the contraction array being that their edges just zip into the rest of the shirt's plain-weave mail fabric, without having to deal with any fancy custom joining methods.  Something they apparently didn't do -- though they might have -- was to insert expansion links throughout a piece of mail in a shirt, changing a rectangle into a conical sort of piece; they found it simpler just to use expansion arrays to flare something out.

 

Mail armor pieces are various.  There's the vest-sized byrnie, the Norman short/half-sleeve hauberk, the 12th-13th-century hauberk with long sleeves and an integral mail hood too, and then to save weight the hauberk shrank in the 14th century to the haburgeon, as more and more plate pieces were fitted to the knightly panoply.  Plate took over for the big boys, and mail moved to a supporting role, armoring the armpits in a way plate simply couldn't, and armoring foot troops, again in various amounts:  a well armored halberdier or billman might sport a breastplate and backplate, and have a mail sleeve for each arm -- modular components!  Helmet his head, and he was about as well equipped as anybody for heavy fighting.  There was the mail collar, or standard-of-mail, intended to keep your head from getting cut off.  Mail coifs were a fairly early feature, eventually getting blended into and integral with the hauberk.  Another mail neck protector emerged in the latter fourteenth century, more or less as the bottom half of a mail coif attached to the helmet of the time, the bascinet.  This was the camail, and it did a good job of protecting the neck from sword cuts, and sheltered the shoulder and upper  back and chest also.

There was mail for the legs -- the close-fitted mail chausses, like thick steel stockings.  You don't want to build any slack at all into the bottom ends of any mail leggings, because mail's ferocious inertia will slap you stupid in fifteen strides.  Armor's supposed to protect you from getting beat up...  The hem of a mailshirt at mid- to upper thigh is really plenty enough.

There was a sixteenth-century variation on the mail collar that extended down to cover most of the upper body and the upper arms:  the bishop's-mantle.  A one size fits all piece for the Landsknechts.  Big in Germany.

There were even mail drawers for the mounted man who wanted to maximize his chances of sons and heirs later.  These covered hips, ass, and 'nads, and laced closed with a couple of thongs.  These were made of fine mail of small links for comfort.

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On 12/20/2018 at 0:35 PM, Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support said:

We sell tutorials on scalemail bras and maille bras. The hauberk and coif instructions are actually free - you can find them here

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/bxfag14l3whckb5/AAAT_Ds7m4Y0crVFChH5a62ka?dl=0

Those are all I know of that we sell or have.

Jodey

Thank you! I did buy the chain mail bra instructions, my issue and struggle right now is knowing how to properly measure someone for it, I did not find anything in the instructions to really help with that. Any info or suggestions on measuring/sizing?

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I probablyget more than I need but as a bare minimum I get around the chest (under the breasts) and another at the widest point of the breasts. from the top of the shoulders to where the cups will start in the front and from the top of the shoulder to where the back strap wraps around. I generally ask for cup size(C,D, GGG...) to get an idea how many contractions and expansions might be needed.

Edited by calisandra

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