Jump to content
Nordhri

Bishops Mantle help

Recommended Posts

Greetings!

I'm interested in making a rounded Bishop's Mantle. There's a great tutorial on youtube, but its a squared mantle. Also, I am curious if it is possible to do a mantle with dragonscale?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a way to make one that is rounded. From the bottom edge of the coif, hand a single ring off of each ring in the bottom row. On the next row, connect them like regular chainmail, and hand 1 loose ring off the bottom of each.

Repeat on each successive row until the mantle is as big around as you want it.

IMG_4051.thumb.JPG.211c92b5c8ae292b02791bc9c7af83e5.JPGIt's the same method I use for the bottom of dice bags (see attached).

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see what you are saying. Since I am doing a mantle and not a coif, would I begin with a strip of 4-in-1 then? Also, I assume tge enlargement process would change for smaller rings? I'm not saying ai want to go to mithril (spelling) levels of small. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is how I wove a mantle in the past. I made a chain three rings wide (16 gauge wire 5/16in. i.d.) just long enough to slip over my head after closing it into a circle without tearing off my ears and nose. Two to three inches longer than the circumference of your noggin should work. I kept count of my links so I could 'square' the circle as evenly as possible. (example 60 rings long means 15 rings on a side.) I then worked four rectangles of mail to the desired length. After that, I filled in the space between those rectangles with triangles of mail attached along their diagonal edges to them. Last, I ran a 'belt' nine rings wide around the outer edge. I didn't feel like adding dags, but I did decide to run the collar higher up my neck with a hook closure afterwards for a 'close fit'. Panel construction is generally faster than row expansion construction, and when it is draped over you it does not look squared off at all, especially since your triangles lay front, back, and over your shoulders rather than the rectangles.

I have not tried to do a mantle with the dragonscale pattern, but theoretically, it should work with the method I outlined above, though it will be bulkier, stiffer, and will not conform to you quite as nicely as 4 in 1. The 'seams' between the panels might be a little more visible too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/29/2019 at 8:41 AM, Nordhri said:

I see what you are saying. Since I am doing a mantle and not a coif, would I begin with a strip of 4-in-1 then? Also, I assume tge enlargement process would change for smaller rings? I'm not saying ai want to go to mithril (spelling) levels of small. :)

Yes, starting with a thin row of 4in1 would be the way to go. The method should work with most any size rings you want to do, I used the same method with 3/16", 3/8", 1/4", & 5/8" rings.

Once you have your base strip of 4in1, it can help to make chains out as far as you want the mantle to extend. Count how many rings around the base strip is, but make sure it is divisible by a whole number, for my bags I use 6 chains, but you can use as many as you want. Just remember, the space between each chain will end up as a side of the finished mantle, and thus a rounder appearance. But if you use too many chains, it may not lay flat, so I recommend to make it divisible no more that 8 chains.

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The difference between a square mantle and round mantle is where the expansions are placed. If they're in the same location in every row,  that's a square. Spreading them out so they aren't stacked makes a circle. Changing the number of expansions per row changes the 3D shape.  6 or 7 per row makes a flat disc.  4 or 5 per row makes a shallow cone or pyramid. 1-3 per row makes a sharp cone. Zero expansions per row makes a cylinder.

Those numbers are per-row average.  If you alternate having 12 expansions in one row and zero in the next, that makes a flat, very round circle. You can also make the shape oval by having more expansions near your shoulders and fewer on your chest/back.

That's for Euro 4-1. With dragonscale, the same rules apply, but expansions don't blend into the rest of the weave (example: http://www.mailleartisans.org/articles/articledisplay.php?key=495), so a visually smooth curve is going to be harder. Dragon scale does form a nice wide V.  If you don't hate the geometric look, a V front and back with seams on your shoulders could look pretty sharp. No expansions needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks very much both of you.

This forum has always been kind and offers useful info. Eric, thanks for the insight. I think I will try both, 4-in-1 and DScale eventually. The more I think of it, and re-watch the Youtube tutorial, the squared look isn't as bad. I've decided to not get into dags. Eventually I will also experiment with scale maille. For now, I aim to do something with euro 4-in-1 possibly with a solid color and accent at the neckline and bottom edge. I may even just to a cheap (price wise) aluminium version to get the feel for the project.

This is the tutorial I mean:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's basically weaving four trapezoids together on their diagonal edges. If you can handle this, the pattern I mentioned should be no problem for you either. Another way to explain it: you can do four rectangles 3/4 inch wider than 1/4 of your head's circumference, and four equilateral triangles as long as your rectangles. Weave the diagonal edges of the triangles onto the flat edges of the rectangles. Then add the three row thick inner and nine row thick outer 'belts' of mail to round it off as you see fit. Whichever way you choose to go, good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As noted above, the basic-basic way to build a bishop's-mantle is to include expansions, whether in every linkrow going around, or alternating linkrows.  I've heard 4 expansions per row gives a flat circle.  If as Eric says, this comes out more a cone than a flat disc -- which I'd understood 3 expansions/linkrow would yield -- still no worries at least out to the width of your shoulders, you being kinda-sorta conical there.  6 or 7 expansions/row might overdo a little, with the effect of making the mantle rather heavier, while giving its hem all the more resiliency because there are more links down there, the mail expanding along the resilient, row-wise direction and giving your muscular, brawny Landsknecht-like sword arm(s) freedom.  Lots of  brawny points :dry:.   Very valuable swinging a six-foot Zweihänder sword about! -- along with tactical desirability thereby -- they paid those big-sword guys double, you know, because their job in the battle line was dangerous as hell, such as protecting the colors.  A twohanded sword guy with his arms restricted was a dead twohander sword guy.

Any scheme of expansions that seems advantageous seems to end up working; put sufficient expansions in and you just can't really go wrong making a mantle entirely of  expanding circles of links.

While just nothing but the big-steel-doily is plenty good, and effective armour, there's also no real rule against building a cylindrical collar into the thing.  You'd want it to be a) lined for comfort and b) lace closed to fit your neck -- a vertical slit is fine, and use of leather thong (probably historical) or some boot lace (mainly SCA) is strong enough.

Edited by Konstantin the Red

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×