Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
RagnarLothbrok

Ringlord's Shirt combat grade kit question

Recommended Posts

So I'm looking to get back into the hobby after many years, and have never made a full shirt of mail.  I want to go stainless and 14ga 3/8 is what I just ordered for a bag of 3000.  I just looked at the kit and see that its discounted, and will actually be cheaper to purchase than just buying bags of bulk rings piecemeal, but I want to see if anyone here has done the kit before.  Are there any other pictures of the shirt apart from the one on the product page?  How are the instructions?  If the shirt looks like the one in the product pic (I assume it does), then its exactly the style I'd be looking for.  Thanks for the help :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A shirt is a large, though straightforward, project.  If you are not an unusually large person, you're probably going to use five, six, or seven bags of 3K links per by way of quantity.  Expect to concentrate at least 25 pounds of links into this -- 14ga (.080") links are stout.

Once you have woven anything with some area to it you are going to succeed at building a shirt.  Whether the kit instructs well or poorly, you will be able to build a good, livable, flexible, agile shirt indeed suited to fight in -- SCA rattan, anyway -- by downloading and keeping the Trevor Barker instructions, which reproduce a 15th century German mailshirt and you can do any mods you'd like, such as sleeve length, confidently.  You can't get into serious trouble quickly at all, weaving an E4-1 shirt in butted links.  Shirt making is something close to knitting a sweater.  It feels like a sweater wearing it; weighs like a backpack, clings like a sweater.

https://web.archive.org/web/20160508055350/http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm

It's about four pages of typescript and diagrams.  Read Section 3 attentively.  A mailshirt with a bit of a waistline to it can still be pulled on over your head, but will be less inclined to try and sneak downhill through your cinch belt as you move about than a straight tubular torso will be.  You're taking some advantage of mail's dragginess over any bodily hump.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I remember correctly the kit instructions are more about weaving 4-in-1, in general, rather than a specific pattern. Given the amount of body variation possible that's likely for the best.

I rather loosely based my personal shirt on the pattern from a shirt in the Wallace Collection, known as O-1848, as interpreted by Nikolas Lloyd (also known as "Lindybeige"). His musings on the matter can be found here:

http://www.lloydianaspects.co.uk/armourMaking/mailMaking.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×