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Xynyth

Dremel saw blades

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So I asked for a jewelers saw for x-mas and I got a dremel! Yay but not what I was expecting. I figured I could make a cutting rig out of it even though I've only seen it done with bigger tools.

My question is what kind/size blades to buy. I've searched out a few that look appropriate but I was hoping someone could tell me for sure or have some direct experience with a dremel as a cutting rig.

I've searched some articles/threads on here and MAIL and while they are helpful I'm either not processing them correctly or there is some basic knowledge the authors assume I know.

If someone can point me at a particularly helpful article or something that would be great too :)

Things I'd like to cut are no bigger than 16g and no smaller than 24g copper, BA, brass, bronze, EC, fine and sterling silvers. Maybe one day if I get brave some goldfill.

For now my biggest concern is the blade size/# of teeth/width of the blade, that kind of thing. Thanks for your help!

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Most dremmels don't offer the torque or speed control to get decent cuts on jumprings.

I picked up a saw for mine that left a huge kerf with wicked burrs. After tumbling I ended up with pear shaped rings.

The koil kutter system and the jump ringer are close but I don't have any experiance withe those.

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Just a thought to add, a dowel rod slightly smaller than your coil is an excellent stabilizer and keeps the rings from flying all over, Lowes, Home Depot, Hobby Lobby, etc for them. Cheap and wood so they can be reused until they break, then replace -talking $.50 to $1.25 depending on size, lasts maybe 50-100 18" long coils for the 1/8th inch rings I am making-.

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.015's 337270

.009's 337273

What is the hardest density in terms of material and/or guage wire that you use these for? Anything which is smaller than 18g 3/16" id that's not Bright Aluminum, Copper or Brass?

I also use

http://theringlord.com/cart/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=73&cat=Saw+Cutting+Tools&websess=44409536249419 KXAMSBLADE8

with a drill press slowed down to 200RPMs to cut stainless -any size and larger rings 18gauge 3/16 and up BA Copper or Brass. Fast and beautiful cuts.

What all do you need to set up the KXamsBlade8?

KXAMSBLADE8 has a 1.75" diameter

KXARBOR1/2X3/8 Arbor for 1/2'' ID Saw Blades for 3/8" Chuck, face is 1"

or

KXARBOR3/8X3/8 Arbor for 3/8'' ID Jewelers Slotting Saw Blade, face is 3/4"

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You can pretty much make your own jumpringer out of some clever PVC cuts, a Dremel Flexshaft and the proper arbor. I read an article about it here a few years back when the Ringinator was in design, but I haven't been unable to unearth it.

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You can pretty much make your own jumpringer out of some clever PVC cuts, a Dremel Flexshaft and the proper arbor. I read an article about it here a few years back when the Ringinator was in design, but I haven't been unable to unearth it.

The keywords you're looking for are the "Harmony" system, dubbed after the TRL user here who designed it.

Contenti has some superthin dremel blades (actual saw blades with teeth, not grinding wheels). As thin as 0.004".

Edited by Cynake

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What is the hardest density in terms of material and/or guage wire that you use these for? Anything which is smaller than 18g 3/16" id that's not Bright Aluminum, Copper or Brass?

What all do you need to set up the KXamsBlade8?

KXAMSBLADE8 has a 1.75" diameter

KXARBOR1/2X3/8 Arbor for 1/2'' ID Saw Blades for 3/8" Chuck, face is 1"

or

KXARBOR3/8X3/8 Arbor for 3/8'' ID Jewelers Slotting Saw Blade, face is 3/4"

I use the cut off wheels to cut everything, from stainless spring steel 16gauge to 20gauge bright alum. I have used cuttoff wheels to slice 3 feet of stainless steel 18gauge, shaping the metal before i work it.

For the KXAMSBLADE8 I use the KXARBOR3/8x3/8 and a drill press, I also found a 90 degree turn for the shank so my blade is straight up-down.. but thats not a requirement.

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I use the cut off wheels to cut everything, from stainless spring steel 16gauge to 20gauge bright alum. I have used cuttoff wheels to slice 3 feet of stainless steel 18gauge, shaping the metal before i work it.

This is with the 337273 wheels, right? I ask because I still have some 14g galvanized steel coils that I need to clip that I've been waiting until I have a setup to saw-cut, and have not had good luck with cut-off wheels so far.

For the KXAMSBLADE8 I use the KXARBOR3/8x3/8 and a drill press, I also found a 90 degree turn for the shank so my blade is straight up-down.. but thats not a requirement.

Have you tried both arbors, or just the jeweler's one?

The keywords you're looking for are the "Harmony" system, dubbed after the TRL user here who designed it.

For the specific thread, you can find it in the Trading Post section.

Edited by octavian

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So I'll start off by saying I don't like trying to cut coils with dremels. I did it originally to cut all my coils and I went through cutoff wheels like crazy and didn't get all that much bang for my buck.

I will say, cutting galvanized steel with them is probably not the smartest thing. I would recommend some sort of dust mask for cutting any metal really, especially if you are doing it indoors. It creates a huge amount of dust and breathing it just can't be good for you.

Personally, I use the ringinator now and like it. There's a few changes I'm planning on making to it, but that's just me. Once you have a motor for it(I use my drill press) the cheaper version works quite well. It took a little work to put it all together to the point where it works well though. That or buying rings has seemed to work the best for me.

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Cutting galvanized coils without something to collect the dust (oil or a vacuum duct collector) is a bad idea. Even if you use a mask the dust will get everywhere. When you finish cutting a take off the mask you will still be breathing the dust days of not months after. Zinc dist is very bad for your health.

Movak

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So I'll start off by saying I don't like trying to cut coils with dremels. I did it originally to cut all my coils and I went through cutoff wheels like crazy and didn't get all that much bang for my buck.

I will say, cutting galvanized steel with them is probably not the smartest thing. I would recommend some sort of dust mask for cutting any metal really, especially if you are doing it indoors. It creates a huge amount of dust and breathing it just can't be good for you.

Personally, I use the ringinator now and like it. There's a few changes I'm planning on making to it, but that's just me. Once you have a motor for it(I use my drill press) the cheaper version works quite well. It took a little work to put it all together to the point where it works well though. That or buying rings has seemed to work the best for me.

Yeah, it wasn't my first choice but it was VERY thoughtful of my mother in law. She even went and bought a whole bunch of other things to go with it like clamps and vices. Some of it is useless but boy did she go above and beyond. I'd feel bad if I didn't at least try to use it, and in the end I can use it for a lot more things than ring cutting which is nice.

I've been looking at theseVery fine tooth blades and these.

Thoughts?

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I bought a dremel just to cut coils with. I'll never do it again.

The regular cutoff wheels make noticeable deformations in rings when closed, even in extra-large 3/8" rings.

The mess created by the dust was awful, though I made a nice etch-a-sketch style toy from the grindings.

The coils get HOT; I burned some interesting patterns into the wood of the table I was using to brace the coil, since vices just don't work on a round spring- they vibrate too easy. A leather glove will keep the heat off, but offers little to no stability.

The human hand is only so stable- unless you're a trained surgeon, there's going to be a large amount of vibration, doubling or even tripling the kerf size, leading to more ring deformation.

Heat, lack of stabilization, and poor control will lead to many, many shattered blades for relatively few rings. Especially with those highly expensive ultra-thin blades that actually offer the required small kerf for decent rings.

In the end the heat generated melted the arbor connected to the diamond blades I had decided to use rather than the thin HSS blades that snapped too often, and I realized that by dropping $30 for an arbor and blade from TRL, I could hook this thing up to a drill with a $2 Home Depot light dimmer and some 'dumpster gifts' to make a Stargazer-style rig. That one blade lasted through 3 pounds of steel with no lubrication. Once I could afford some lube, the second blade lasted 30 pounds of galvy before losing a tooth, and still powered through many, many pounds of aluminum. Since switching to a Ringinator, I've only used two blades; the first broke because I didn't bolt the thing to the table (my bad) and the second just finally wore through.

Don't get me wrong. I love my dremel and use it at least every week. I just wish I hadn't wasted so much wire trying to cut with that thing.

What does this parable mean? Stability WILL be an issue. Total cost savings with any long-term or large-scale project or operation will far outweigh the start-up costs of both money and time to create or buy a specialized ring-making apparatus.

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FYI: The Dremel 670 mini saw attachment holds a jewelers slotting saw with 3/8" hole and contains the dust/lubricant efficiently. Compatible ONLY with Dremel models 400, 398, 395, 300, 285, 275, 800, 780. It's $22.52 on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-670-Mini-Saw-Attachment/dp/B00008Z9ZP) $31.49 at Home Depot.

For someone experienced and confident with a Dremel, this might be a wonderful thing.

I'm not recommending it, I produced more ruined rings than usable ones with it. But I think this probably was more my lack of experience with the process than the attachment itself. Definitely NOT recommended for 510 phosphor bronze - I broke the blade, the attachment AND burned out the motor of my Dremel 400 trying to cut 19g SWG bronze.

Bought a Dremel 4000 and ordered the Koil Kutter blade guard/guide from Dave Arens.

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Have you tried both arbors, or just the jeweler's one?

Just the jewelers.

But since then I have converted over to the Ringinator system, linked to harbor frieght drill press.. the press was a gift a few years back and only 50 bucks.

I was burning through cut off wheels at a rate of more than 10 a day, cutting 1000s of rings, but still thats a lot of cost and shipping. For $200 the ringinator is faster and more efficient and I don't need my dremel mastery to use --kinda miss that part actually-- .

I still use the dremel for 20ga stainless -easier to that reconfiguring the ringer for only a 100 rings-.

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The Dremel 4000 with M2 HSS jeweler's slotting saws in .010" and .008" work fine. TRL has the .010 for low price but high shipping and takes a week; Travers in NY sells Malco M2 HSS saws in .008 and they arrive overnight. I like the .008 for the slim kerf but I think the .010 is probably more durable.

So far I have cut Argentium, GF and phosphor bronze 18ga and 20ga at about 14,000 RPM. For 20ga anodized niobium I keep the coils very short, use bur-life rubbed directly on the coil for lubrication, and use the lowest setting - below 5,000 RPM. The finished rings are very clean, with minimal burs.

Of all things, the enameled copper gives me the most grief. I haven't figured out the best blade/speed combo on that yet. Success stories welcome.

Edited by titanias-garden.com

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I actually tried this the other day on my test setup. I tried cutting some bronze at 8000rpm with a 1.5"OD 0.010" thick blade, the rings did cut nicely. But, its more like sliding a knife through then than cutting. Instead of removing the material from the kerf, it just pushes it aside, so the cuts have these fantastic burrs on them. It took 2 days in a tumbler to get them all off. Even with coolant flow, the blade life is greatly diminished. I only made it through 3-4 lbs before it went dull. At normal speeds, 500rpm, I can get 30+lbs of bronze out of a single blade.

So in summary, it works, but not very well.

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