Jump to content
ljt

deburring help needed

Recommended Posts

i moved this question from discussion to industry: i have been reading about deburring sterling silver rings and i am confused - there is lots of info out there. i cut my rings using the jumpringer. they always have tiny burs on them which i have been filing by hand - i am SO TIRED of doing this. tumbling with stainless does not debur. i think i should be using ceramic media but what shape & fineness - please point me to a place to buy what i need. i got fine ceramic media from monsterslayer.com but it doesn't seem to be very successful at deburring. i don't want to buy the wrong thing again - please help!!! thanks in advance.

laura

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, you didn't move it you copied it. Second, discussion is the better place for this as it doesn't deal with the industry of making and selling chainmaille.

Movak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, you didn't move it you copied it. Second, discussion is the better place for this as it doesn't deal with the industry of making and selling chainmaille.

Movak

so sorry - i thought deburring had to do with making chainmaille. i guess i misread the directions. anyway, thanks for the help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so sorry - i thought deburring had to do with making chainmaille. i guess i misread the directions. anyway, thanks for the help.

If you're not interested in saving the silver dust, wash your cut rings with some soap and water to rinse off any residual lube, and then toss them into a sock and tie the sock shut. Toss that sock in the dryer with a load of laundry. When they come out, 99% of those burrs will be gone and the rings will be just about mirror polished.

This is effectively free, doesn't require a specialized machine, and is stupid easy. I wonder why I seem to be the only advocate of this method?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're not interested in saving the silver dust, wash your cut rings with some soap and water to rinse off any residual lube, and then toss them into a sock and tie the sock shut. Toss that sock in the dryer with a load of laundry. When they come out, 99% of those burrs will be gone and the rings will be just about mirror polished.

This is effectively free, doesn't require a specialized machine, and is stupid easy. I wonder why I seem to be the only advocate of this method?

well, that's easy to try so i will do so. none of the other methods have worked - my burs seem to be especially stubborn. i have pretty much given up on getting rid of them - i'll go back to filing by hand, one ring at a time - bummer. thanks for the advice - i'll let you know if it works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you post a picture of your rings with burrs? If the burr is more that a thin tab on the inside of the ring you may be having a cutting issue. What RPM are you cutting at and what size blades are you using? If it is too fast and with inadequate cooling you may be melting some of the metal causing large burs that tumbling will not remove.

Movak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you post a picture of your rings with burrs? If the burr is more that a thin tab on the inside of the ring you may be having a cutting issue. What RPM are you cutting at and what size blades are you using? If it is too fast and with inadequate cooling you may be melting some of the metal causing large burs that tumbling will not remove.

Movak

i'll try to take a picture tomorrow but the burs are on the sides & top & bottom of the rings. i'm using the jumpring system with my flexshaft & am cutting as per ray grossman's instruction: full speed (don't know the rpm) & using the ray grossman blades, specifically for this purpose. his instructions say to press down as i cut & move the blade "QUICKLY" thru the coil. i don't have any way of knowing if i'm cutting TOO quickly; "quickly" is relative, i guess. the bur can't be removed by any means other than hand filing, if that gives you an idea of size/thickness of them. thanks for the help.

Laura

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

High RPM + fast feed + no lube = High heat = melted burs. What is the brand of flex shaft are you using? According to this page you should be cutting at 196RPM. You are probably cutting at 2 to 3 times as much. Try the following;

1. slow the speed down to 196 rpm.

2. Lube the coils with oil

3. feed slower

I bet most if not all the burs will disappear.

Movak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

High RPM + fast feed + no lube = High heat = melted burs. What is the brand of flex shaft are you using? According to this page you should be cutting at 196RPM. You are probably cutting at 2 to 3 times as much. Try the following;

1. slow the speed down to 196 rpm.

2. Lube the coils with oil

3. feed slower

I bet most if not all the burs will disappear.

Movak

i'm using a foredom flexshaft & lots of lube - cut bur, to be exact. what oil do you recommend for lube; i can change that, if necessary. i'll slow down & see what happens - i don't know how i would "slow down to 196 rpm", but i can easily slow down the saw & the cutting. thanks again. L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What series of Foredom do you have? SR, TX or LX? The lube you have is fine. SR maxes at 18,000 RPM. TX maxes at 15,000RPM and LX maxes at 5,00RPM so you were cutting way too fast. So using those figures the SR should be at 1%, TX at 2% and LX at 4% of max speed. In short, start very slowly. If the blade chatters you are going too slow.

Movak

Edited by movak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What series of Foredom do you have? SR, TX or LX? The lube you have is fine. SR maxes at 18,000 RPM. TX maxes at 15,000RPM and LX maxes at 5,00RPM so you were cutting way too fast. So using those figures the SR should be at 1%, TX at 2% and LX at 4% of max speed. In short, start very slowly. If the blade chatters you are going too slow.

Movak

model SR & it says on the housing that it maxes at 18000; whoa, nellie - way fast. i'll slow 'er down & see what happens. thank you. i'll let you know what happens.

Laura

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

model SR & it says on the housing that it maxes at 18000; whoa, nellie - way fast. i'll slow 'er down & see what happens. thank you. i'll let you know what happens.

Laura

note to chainmailbill: the rings in the sock, in the dryer did not remove my burs, as suspected. i do think i have a cutting issue, but thank you for your reply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, thanks to movak, my rings are now getting very close to "bur - less". incredible - i slowed my flexshaft WAY down - that's the only thing i did different from what i had been doing. i actually cut as slowly as possible; the rings are much smoother. i'm hoping that, with some tumbling, they will be extremely smooth so that i can begin to maille directly out of the saw. what a concept!

thanks so much to everyone who responded, but especially to movak who stuck with it. i can't thank you enough.

maille on.

Laura

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add my 2 cents in also beware of dull blades. Those too will cause burring that will be very difficult to get rid of...

yes, thanks. the first thing i did when i started this odyssey of bur removal was to put on a new blade. thanks for the reminder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

I bought the Pepe Jump Ring Maker + Economy Flex Shaft from http://Contenti.com, and I had been getting crappy results. The included directions, and some video demonstrations instruct you to run the blade at full speed. I was getting smoke, heat, and crappy jump rings. I slowed the blade way down like ljt did, and they are finally looking like the good ones I bought on http://Etsy.com. I still have to practice a bit, but now I'm making usable rings.

Thanks again Movak and ljt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×