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matrain1

Dog Collar?

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Greetings,

A friend of mine would like a chainmail dog collar for his pit bull. Not really sure what would be a good material or anything. Any suggestions or links would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you and well wishes,

Jesse

Edited by matrain1

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I think a decorative collar would be great and, since it is only decorative, the material doesn't really matter.

The reason I say decorative only is twofold. First of all, unless you use some seriously heavy gauge stainless steel or other very strong metal or solder every link closed, the chances are that it simply won't be strong enough to hold Fido should he decide to make a run for it. Secondly, even if it is strong enough to hold the dog (and remember just how strong pit bulls are), then the links are likely to injure or at the very least, pinch, his neck.

HTH

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A chainmaille collar will NOT be strong enough. Your best bet is to buy a good, heavy-duty nylon or leather collar and then make a chainmaille strip to decorate it.

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Heck, both my cats have chainmail collars. They shed the old canvas ones like crazy. Since I made them both chainmail collars (which slip easily over their head should they want to ditch it) about 8 or 9 years back they've both lost the new one once, and come to me meowing like crazy to lead me to where the collar was lying so I'd put it back on them. They are wearing rosco spring steel collars that are somewhere close to 16g 1/4" in a simple spiral weave.

Re:Pit bull. I would bet that butted 14gauge 5/16" stainless steel in a tripled byzantine weave would hold them but it is a bear to weave. Takes a lot of arm strength but is worth it to me because those are some of my best selling wallet chains.

Thralen...

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omg...i wanna see someone armour a cat!

LOL! First you'd have to armour yourself!

Re:Pit bull. I would bet that butted 14gauge 5/16" stainless steel in a tripled byzantine weave would hold them but it is a bear to weave. Takes a lot of arm strength but is worth it to me because those are some of my best selling wallet chains.

Butted links in 14g might not actually open enough for the collar to come off but I would be very worried about them opening slightly and then closing on the skin as Llisa already mentioned. I can't help but wince just at the thought of getting pinched by a 14g ring. :o

Our pit bull can break quick links (which screw shut and look like this-- quick link --for those unfamiliar).

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Butted links in 14g might not actually open enough for the collar to come off but I would be very worried about them opening slightly and then closing on the skin as Llisa already mentioned. I can't help but wince just at the thought of getting pinched by a 14g ring. :o

Our pit bull can break quick links (which screw shut and look like this-- quick link --for those unfamiliar).

Unless the dog can put out over 200 pounds of continued pressure or over 400 pounds of instantaneous pressure the links should not do that. I (weighing over 200 pounds) hold myself off the ground with one of these chains wrapped around a tree branch as a demonstration of the wallet chains. I let people look at the chain while I am supporting myself and after the fact. There is little to no opening going on in them. My personal wallet chain I've used for 8 years is the same type and has no links whose closures have opened somewhat despite years of abuse (read: the demonstration I just talked about done repeatedly as well as regular usage).

Have you tried stainless quick links as opposed to galvy quick links? They cost more but the strength difference is well worth the price. I wouldn't recommend the chain that I did in galvanized steel but the upgrade to stainless makes all the difference in the world.

TML (Thralen, signed with wrong user name last time)

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Pit bulls in competition pull 12 to 23 times their body weight depending on category. So a 60 lb dog could pull 720 to 1,380 lbs. Record weights are around 8,000 lbs. Heavy chains on a dog that can pull that hard can cause serious neck injury.

The quick links were a temporary measure (hehe, very temporary ;) ). I was just providing a real life example of how strong they can be. I thought I had a pretty good idea of how strong a dog like this could be before my BF & Magnum (the pit bull) moved in but I was way off base.

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Unless the dog can put out over 200 pounds of continued pressure or over 400 pounds of instantaneous pressure the links should not do that. I (weighing over 200 pounds) hold myself off the ground with one of these chains wrapped around a tree branch as a demonstration of the wallet chains. I let people look at the chain while I am supporting myself and after the fact. There is little to no opening going on in them. My personal wallet chain I've used for 8 years is the same type and has no links whose closures have opened somewhat despite years of abuse (read: the demonstration I just talked about done repeatedly as well as regular usage).

The important part of you post if the "little or no opening". If there is a little opening, hair or skin can get into that opening. When the pressure is released that opening will close causing a pinch. The next pull of the collar with tear the hair or skin. To stop this there has to be zero opening; welding would fix that.

Movak

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Welded rings would still solve the issue. Try welding spring stainless and I think you should be fine.

Wouldn't you still want a few butted rings to make sure it can break off? I'm only familiar with cat collars, but we ONLY get break-away collars to avoid potential choking hazards.

(BTW, don't buy cat collars from Wal-Mart. Not only was it not break-away, the adjuster kept slipping & made the thing smaller on our poor kitty's neck, my mom had to cut it off)

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Wouldn't you still want a few butted rings to make sure it can break off? I'm only familiar with cat collars, but we ONLY get break-away collars to avoid potential choking hazards.

Cat collars designed to break because cats jump around, climb trees and get in other situations where collars can get caught on objects becoming a choking hazard. Dogs on the otherhand can pull very hard on collars and anything that can break will. If there is a ring on a dog collar that can open it will and will pinch the dog.

Movak

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Cat collars designed to break because cats jump around, climb trees and get in other situations where collars can get caught on objects becoming a choking hazard. Dogs on the otherhand can pull very hard on collars and anything that can break will. If there is a ring on a dog collar that can open it will and will pinch the dog.

Movak

not only that....it's for an effing pitbull! you ever see the neck on them?? it's not like my semi-retarded miniature dachshund, pitbulls are strong. if there's a weak link, that's all it's gonna take for that collar to come apart if he/she gets excited and starts pulling.

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Cat collars designed to break because cats jump around, climb trees and get in other situations where collars can get caught on objects becoming a choking hazard. Dogs on the otherhand can pull very hard on collars and anything that can break will. If there is a ring on a dog collar that can open it will and will pinch the dog.

Movak

Ah, okay. Like I said I only have experience getting collars for cats. Its so ingrained in me that Non-break way collar = BAD that I didn't know it was different for dogs.

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