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BaruMonkey

What's your weaving speed?

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Lol, thanks that was a good laugh. FYI, the fastest machines I know of do ~200 rings/minute. Still, about 14X faster.

As far as my speed goes, for a long time I was at ~500 rph until a friend of mine showed me the OOOR speed weaving method. I knew about it before, but he used it to whup me in a speed weaving contest. I switched from the OOOC method and that was an instant increase to ~700 rph. The last ~200 rph is from using modded pliers and constant practice working at TRL.

As far as speed goes for professionals, between 300-500 rph for armor and 150-250 rph for jewelry is good. It's difficult to remain competitive at speeds slower than those. If you want to get faster the #1 rule is NEVER PUT YOUR PLIERS DOWN!

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Lol, thanks that was a good laugh. FYI, the fastest machines I know of do ~200 rings/minute. Still, about 14X faster.

As far as my speed goes, for a long time I was at ~500 rph until a friend of mine showed me the OOOR speed weaving method. I knew about it before, but he used it to whup me in a speed weaving contest. I switched from the OOOC method and that was an instant increase to ~700 rph. The last ~200 rph is from using modded pliers and constant practice working at TRL.

As far as speed goes for professionals, between 300-500 rph for armor and 150-250 rph for jewelry is good. It's difficult to remain competitive at speeds slower than those. If you want to get faster the #1 rule is NEVER PUT YOUR PLIERS DOWN!

OOOR? OOOC? I am unfamiliar with these abbreviations, though I assume that the R & C stand for row and column, respectively. Will you please explain?

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OOOR? OOOC? I am unfamiliar with these abbreviations, though I assume that the R & C stand for row and column, respectively. Will you please explain?

I assume it's One Open, One Closed versus One Open, One Raw.

When adding onto E4-1, you open one ring, weave it in, put another ring on the open one, then make your closures. The difference is whether the extra ring you put on the open one is pre-closed or if it hasn't yet has anything done to it.

Edited by BaruMonkey

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Yes, that's what I meant.

OOOR is really the only speed weaving method that is actually faster than ORAAT(one ring at a time)

OOOC is still useful if you have free time where it's impractical to weave pieces of maille but fine to preclose rings. Also using OOOC with half solid rings I can hit over 1000 rph, which came in handy when I made shirts for the "In The Name of The King" movie.

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Yes, that's what I meant.

OOOR is really the only speed weaving method that is actually faster than ORAAT(one ring at a time)

Have you tried the "pick up 3 at a time; make chains, add chains to sheet" method?

Movak

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I do 130 or so in a half hour, for say, the dragonscale cuff I'm working on... now that's not counting the time I spent pre-closing small rings, so if I have to count that I will hope I get faster with practice.

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Have you tried the "pick up 3 at a time; make chains, add chains to sheet" method?

Movak

Yes, the ribbon method, I don't consider it a separate speed weaving technique. It's basically just a modified form of either OOOR or OOOC depending on whether or not you preclose your rings. Also, it is optimized for a very limited number of weaves, OOOR/OOOC are much more versatile and work with most weaves.

It's very fast when you are making ribbons as your end product but loses efficiency as the piece gets wider. I generally make a ribbon to start a sheet of maille then continue on OOOR weaving.

For the ribbons themselves I can weave at ~1000+ rph but for connecting them my speed drops to <400 rph. It's a good trade off for a belt made two ribbons wide, but a bad trade off for an entire shirt. Results vary based on individual skill with each technique.

To determine which of the techniques is more efficient for a particular project calculate your rph with ribbons(x), seams(y) and OOOR or OOOC(z) Let n=the #of ribbons required for the project.

If 3nx+(n-1)y>3nz+(n-1)z is true, then the ribbon method will be more efficient.

As examples using my speeds we'll do a 2 ribbon wide belt.

3(2)(1,000)+1(400)>3(2)(900)+1(900)

6,000+400>5,400+900

6,400>6,300

The statement is true so it is more efficient for me to use the ribbon method for this project.

The next example is a shirt 30 ribbons wide.

3(30)(1,000)+29(400)>3(30)900+29(900)

90,000+11,600>81,000+26,100

101,600>107,100

The statement is false so it is not more efficient for me to use the ribbon method for this project.

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Cool math and I agree with it.

My two at a time speed slows as the piece gets bigger and I can make chains on the bus much easier than I can make sheets.

The two numbers are pretty close and for me switching technique would be a major slowdown.

Movak

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It all actually depends on the weave, the metal, and the size of the rings.

If an easy weave, rings and metal, I can get going really fast in a hurry to do something about 380-400 rings

an hour with decent closures. This is with small quick stretching breaks. I don't care to go at this speed for more than an hour cause I'm not

used to it. I could probably go faster but it would look like crud and I would be sore later.

Otherwise I'd rather take my time, relax, have fun and make sure my closures are perfect. I hate snagging mail. I've been mailing for 8 years now. If your new to it I'd suggest working on technique first and then speed up only if you have to. Remember to stretch and take breaks or you can cause a lot of pain to yourself later down the road.

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well i make a byz bracelet with rubber rings so i can do those in 20 min going as fast as possible, i do speed weave 4-1 giving me about 350 per hour and box chain i speed weave making it about 30 min for 6 inches using 16 ga copper 1/4"id and these are all good to perfect closures, becasue most of my maille is jewelry

is that good? I started at 4 hours for 300 rings 6 months ago lol

Edited by Ansarum

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Just timed myself doing a 20ga 7/64" byzantine in stainless steel. It consistently took me 8 seconds per ring so that figures out to about 450 an hour. Of course, that doesn't figure in the time for pre-opening rings. Though I do that fairly quickly too so I'd say that I have an effective time of at least 350-400 rings per hour with the opening. And of course with bigger rings faster. Not too bad, I think.

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Just timed myself doing a 20ga 7/64" byzantine in stainless steel. It consistently took me 8 seconds per ring so that figures out to about 450 an hour. Of course, that doesn't figure in the time for pre-opening rings. Though I do that fairly quickly too so I'd say that I have an effective time of at least 350-400 rings per hour with the opening. And of course with bigger rings faster. Not too bad, I think.

How do you handle the issue of pre-opened rings hooking together? Every time I encounter a pre-opened ring in a pile of rings, usually due to having taken something apart, it grabs on to several other rings causing me to get 4 or 5 rings instead of just the one I am holding on to. I then waste time untangling the mess.

Movak

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I don't understand what people mean when they say they don't count pre-closing or pre-opening the rings. That's part of the weaving process, is it not? Why would you not count that?

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How do you handle the issue of pre-opened rings hooking together? Every time I encounter a pre-opened ring in a pile of rings, usually due to having taken something apart, it grabs on to several other rings causing me to get 4 or 5 rings instead of just the one I am holding on to. I then waste time untangling the mess.

Movak

I dunno. I usually try to keep my pile of open rings spread out so they don't get all snagged up. And Mykal, it seemed to me from reading some of the other posts that others might not have been counting the pre-opening/closing process. Perhaps that's because one could just open/close a ton of rings at a separate time from the times they're actually weaving. Like being on a bus/public transport and just opening/closing rings. *shrugs*

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For me, to make a valid comparison one needs to take into account all effort from raw ring to finished product. Otherwise the comparison is skewed. That is one reason I make chains on the bus instead if wasting my time pre-opening or closing rings.

Movak

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Indeed, and that's why I gave both. An estimate at my speed of straight weaving and an estimate of time spent doing everything involved.

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Last night, I timed my weaving speed doing Euro 4-1 on a 6 row ribbon. I counted out 30 rings and started timing as soon as I opened the first ring. My weaving method is one ring at a time and it took me 20 minutes to the sec to do all 30 rings from starting the prep to finishing. So that would work out to roughly 90 rings an hour.

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I once clocked my weaving speed during a rather uninteresting lecture - I guess that should be equivalent to weaving while watching TV etc.

What I did was: start weaving a E4in1 piece (SS20532)... continue until end of lecture... count rings in completed piece.

Result was 2 rings/minute = 120 rings/hour.

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