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i like the looks of the chainmail pieces I've been seeing here and i think it would be good to try and sell some chainmail stuff. i'm a beginner at making chainmail; ive got euro 4-1 down good and i have a pinch of experience with full Persian, box, and byzantine. i am a very patient person so i have no problem making large scale projects or learning more complicated weaves. however, i think since i am going to try and make money fast it would be better if i did a bunch of smaller scale projects instead. i would like some suggestions on what i should make based on my current experience as well as what seems to sell well.

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It depends on your demographic.

Usualy simple jewlery pieces, juggling balls, foot bags, and small draw sting pouches are a good place to start.

A lot of people make simple chainmail pieces so keep your expectations of makeing money reasonable.

Ebay and etsy have a bunch of stuff imports or people that don't value their time.

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I tend to sell more smaller items (and can earn more for my time on them), but on other hand the big or WOW!! items is what gets everyones attention (but dont get sold very often).

I try to have a balance of the 2.... and every once in a while I get surprised when I sell one of the big items.

Ebay and Etsy seem to be a waste of time and money if you value anytype of profit (at least that has been my experience)

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If your object is to sell a lot of pieces then it truly depends on your market and customers. After that it's about maximizing your profit margin and making the most items in the time you devote to it.

Work in public. Just the other day I sold a piece in a club (the piece I was working on) while I was waiting on my food order. This is actually kind of recovering 'lost time.' I'm there nursing a couple beers waiting for dinner and woulda been otherwise twiddling my thumbs. I've also sat in community/youth centers while waiting on my kids to finish some lessons.

Figure out what weave you're fastest at. I can crank out a Half Persian bracelet in a fine gauge (some might say for a woman) in 2 hours, less for a heavier gauge.

Earrings are quick depending on how you embellish them; say 30 minutes for a small section of weave plus 'dangles' and hooks or posts.

Edited by 5 Pack

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I just did this yesterday. Make a chainmail shirt, hauburke, etc. and then take it to some kind of antique auction. I made $1500 off of a galvy hauburke that I only spent about $70 making.

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I just did this yesterday. Make a chainmail shirt, hauburke, etc. and then take it to some kind of antique auction. I made $1500 off of a galvy hauburke that I only spent about $70 making.

WOW - way to go.

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I just did this yesterday. Make a chainmail shirt, hauburke, etc. and then take it to some kind of antique auction. I made $1500 off of a galvy hauburke that I only spent about $70 making.

and here is proof that people do not understand how business works.

when making something like chainmail, the big cost is NOT the materials it's the time. How much time did you put in on the hauburke? did you have to buy/replace any tools? if you cut your rings, did you factor in that time? and those tools?

personally, I would have to make that hauberk from scratch, buying no tools, in about 70 hours to consider it a profit. Any more then that and I've totally wasted the effort.

I certainly hope you didn't put it up as some sort of antique as well.

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and here is proof that people do not understand how business works.

when making something like chainmail, the big cost is NOT the materials it's the time. How much time did you put in on the hauburke? did you have to buy/replace any tools? if you cut your rings, did you factor in that time? and those tools?

personally, I would have to make that hauberk from scratch, buying no tools, in about 70 hours to consider it a profit. Any more then that and I've totally wasted the effort.

I certainly hope you didn't put it up as some sort of antique as well.

Nah, time is only worth what we perceive it to be. I don't mind spending 50 hours on a project if I enjoyed myself, and honestly if this is a part time craft and not a full time career, making $1500 off of a $70 investment is pretty darn good.

However, for the professionals on this site who depend on that paycheck, the argument is quite different. I personally have a full time job already, so this to me is just extra money on the side.

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Nah, time is only worth what we perceive it to be. I don't mind spending 50 hours on a project if I enjoyed myself, and honestly if this is a part time craft and not a full time career, making $1500 off of a $70 investment is pretty darn good.

However, for the professionals on this site who depend on that paycheck, the argument is quite different. I personally have a full time job already, so this to me is just extra money on the side.

I agree with you for the most part. Being in the same position of not trying to make a living I can charge what I want without the pressure of having to make a sale.

It actually keeps my prices higher then perhaps other people. That and the lack of any local comparable competition allows me the luxury of not compromising on the value I place on my time and skill.

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Nah, time is only worth what we perceive it to be. I don't mind spending 50 hours on a project if I enjoyed myself, and honestly if this is a part time craft and not a full time career, making $1500 off of a $70 investment is pretty darn good.

However, for the professionals on this site who depend on that paycheck, the argument is quite different. I personally have a full time job already, so this to me is just extra money on the side.

I detest people who use this arguement, if you are selling pieces you are doing a professional thing, even if you don't make a living on it. Not only that, you are devaluing the work that all the people who are acutally attempting to make money. I deal with this attitude from crafters all the time, hell I can't even get some people to recognize they need to charge more then just materials.

If your not selling your work and charging at least 10 bucks an hour for your time PLUS materials stick to making stuff for friends, If your gonna actively sell stuff, be realistic about it and don't hurt your fellow crafters, it's a hard enough envrioment.

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I detest people who use this arguement, if you are selling pieces you are doing a professional thing, even if you don't make a living on it. Not only that, you are devaluing the work that all the people who are acutally attempting to make money. I deal with this attitude from crafters all the time, hell I can't even get some people to recognize they need to charge more then just materials.

If your not selling your work and charging at least 10 bucks an hour for your time PLUS materials stick to making stuff for friends, If your gonna actively sell stuff, be realistic about it and don't hurt your fellow crafters, it's a hard enough envrioment.

I agree with you there right now my friends pay materials cost and anyone else pays materials cost plus 14 an hour, because that is what I make at my full time job that is what my time is worth. Even though I don't try and make a living off of it I still refuse to devalue the labor others who do make a living doing it do. Because eventually I may be one of those people, unless of course I start charging cheaply now in which case I will never be able to live on the sale of my merchandise.

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I detest people who use this arguement, if you are selling pieces you are doing a professional thing, even if you don't make a living on it. Not only that, you are devaluing the work that all the people who are acutally attempting to make money. I deal with this attitude from crafters all the time, hell I can't even get some people to recognize they need to charge more then just materials.

If your not selling your work and charging at least 10 bucks an hour for your time PLUS materials stick to making stuff for friends, If your gonna actively sell stuff, be realistic about it and don't hurt your fellow crafters, it's a hard enough envrioment.

here's the problem with paying yourself too good a wage:

In the eyes of your consumer, you're not competing with other handmade goods. You're competing with cheap chinese labor as well. You're competing with machine manufactury too.

Let's switch gears for a moment:

I'm a bookbinder as well as having some experience working with veneers. I decided a while back to combine the two to make a rather unique product.

You can see it here:

http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w35/postindustrialist/090.jpg

It's not the greatest bound book, but let's go into the process of making it:

I start out with bookboard, which is the basis of all hardcovers. I give it two coats of poly to reduce the warpage associated with all paper related products due to changes in humidity. While they dry, I painstakingly cut each piece of the veneer work by hand. That means with a triangle for measuring out angles, a ruler as a guide and measure, and using an exacto knife with a number 11 blade. Each piece has to be cut to the utmost precision I can muster due to the problem of accumulative errors. Even a fractional degree off on the angle can result in a gap between each point, which in turn throws off the other pieces creating an increasingly larger gap. The pieces are then arranged, taped with blue painters tape to allow for easy peeling of the 1/64th of an in thick veneer, and placed on a background. The overall piece is cut out, fitted into said background and taped again.

THEN the veneer is adhered with contact cement, wait for that to dry, and meanwhile cutting on a guillotine paper trimmer the paper for the book block , which is 50lb weight sketch grade paper. If I wanted deckled edges. each piece of paper would have to be carefully torn to reveal an "unfinished" looking edge. These are arranged in stacks of five sheets, which are in turn, folded in half to make ten sheet signatures (most binders only do for sheets as tradition, which gives 8 sheets in the book, or 16 pages, front and backs counted) Once the contact cement is dried, two or three coasts of poly are applied again, this time to seal the wood and give it its satin "wet" finish. I mark the signatures for sewing, very carefully so that my stitches will line up uniform, and once the poly is dry, I glue a cardstock decorate page to the inside, and add a copper tape edge to hide the unsightly "sandwich" make the same marks in the same places so I can drill the covers for my sewing. Then comes the sewing, which is easy, yet takes a long time, and am careful not to rip the paper as I sew the book tightly to prevent loose sloppy signatures (a signature is the folded stack of five sheets). Only after I have finished this do I have a completed book. I stamp the inside front cover with a green fern stamp, sometimes sign it, so people know it's one of mine and handmade, and it's ready for sale.

For ALLLLLLLLLLLLL that work, plus the photography and other marketing I need to do, to the customer, it's not too dissimilar a product to something they can pick up like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Moleskine-Sketchbook-Large/dp/8883701151/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1296582292&sr=8-2

Do really think I could charge my time at $30 an hour and remain competitive to my customer against that?

I made a bunch of them instead and charged basically double my materials plus a little extra: essentially $35, and still people had a hard time justifying spending that for a blank book. But then again, it, like many of my projects/products are things I do for the love of creating, learning, and enjoyment of the challenge.

Jewelers have it easy when it comes to craft work. The standard markup on jewelry is about 5 times, and a craft jeweler doesn't have to work through a crapload of middlemen to get to that. There's also a fair number of premade materials out there for them to use (also with a rather huge markup, though I love TRL because they don't charge 4-6 cents a jump ring when for a buck's worth of material you can make 500 rings). It's also always a very popular luxury item that people are trained to be willing to spend extra on. And chainmail garments aren't being mass produced for the general population and shipped out of some third world nation. It's a very niche market with people whom are willing to spend more for what they want as they have no really cheap alternative. By comparison, handmade furniture, knitting and crocheting, and papercrafts all have it far rougher.

And I don't mean to come off as bitter about it, just that the situation on pricing deserves some... perspective. Having dabbled in many, many crafts, as well as seeing my mother try her hand at crafts early in my childhood, I know it's a hard sell at times, but hand making things is an incredibly difficult thing to make those that do not create understand. It takes love of the craft and a masochistic streak to understand you're probably not going to be as respected for you efforts as you deserve, and might not make enough to quite your day job for something you love. God must smile on those that do somehow make it, or they must be spectacularly good, or otherwise they have found ways of taking much of the handwork out of their craft without compromising the handcrafted look.

So if you can get what you can get, fantastic. But very few crafters can make $30 an hour off of their passion.

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here's the problem with paying yourself too good a wage:

So if you can get what you can get, fantastic. But very few crafters can make $30 an hour off of their passion.

As far as I know most people aren't talking about making $30 an hour that is an extraordinary hourly wage. Most crafters are looking to make $10-$20 an hour depending on their market and cost of living.

Just my two rings on the subject though

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As far as I know most people aren't talking about making $30 an hour that is an extraordinary hourly wage. Most crafters are looking to make $10-$20 an hour depending on their market and cost of living.

Just my two rings on the subject though

understandable, and it's difficult to even get that. typically I make something, try to keep costs minimal (but keep track of what I buy) and then set a price based off what what I can reasonably get for my finished project. Typically my wages range between 2-6 dollars an hour, though jewelry I can sometimes get about that 7-12 dollars. I don't remember where I got that $30 an hour thing from, but I remember someone saying it somewhere.

But I've seen knitters and crocheters spend 30+ hours on a blanket, and can't sell it for $100, which, means even at a little more two dollars an hour and disregarding costs, their craft is just not competitive enough to sell. Jewelry's a much easier market.

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I detest people who use this arguement, if you are selling pieces you are doing a professional thing, even if you don't make a living on it. Not only that, you are devaluing the work that all the people who are acutally attempting to make money. I deal with this attitude from crafters all the time, hell I can't even get some people to recognize they need to charge more then just materials.

If your not selling your work and charging at least 10 bucks an hour for your time PLUS materials stick to making stuff for friends, If your gonna actively sell stuff, be realistic about it and don't hurt your fellow crafters, it's a hard enough envrioment.

You're saying you won't work for less than 10 an hour, whereas I'm okay working for 6-7 an hour. If you want to compete, lower your rate. The cheaper you go the more sales you'll make and the more overall money you'll pull in, assuming you don't drop below the cost of materials and overhead. As a full time mailler, you're probably spending quite a bit more time doing this than I am, so for every one product of average quality, you should have multiple products of above average quality. If you disagree with that, either you're not good enough to have above average products (I know I'm not), or you're not dedicating enough time to your trade (the same as working part time vs full time anywhere else).

I'm not saying I sell at cost, I'm simply saying I sell for less than you do because my time holds value both in the entertainment enjoyed while creating the product as well as in the money I'll gain from selling it.

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Wow allot of different opinions about what to charge. There is no right answer. The person who sells for less then their cost is as valid as someone who make 1000% on an item. You get what you are willing to ask for, and you have your own reasons for asking it. I personally look at it based on many factors. The more factors apply to you the more, or less you will charge.

Factor #1. Self Confidence:

How you view your own work will play a big role in what you feel comfortable charging. I charged less inn the beginning for a less experienced product. Charged more as my skills developed, and then found myself charging less on items that I found more easily made. Kinda went full circle on some things.

Factor #2. Available Markets:

Having easy access to vending options might effect how you price. If you only have a couple shows a year you may price higher to make them count. If you have a market every weekend you may price lower to encourage return customers.

Factor #3. Materials Cost:

It makes sense that if your overhead is larger you might charge more. Some people will swallow the cost difference their supply of rings goes up in price a bit. You may live in a location where shipping supplies in is significant, and need to charge more to compensate. You also may prefer the more costly materials for your work.

Factor #4. Competition:

How many crafters you have in your immediate market that make maille will have a huge effect on your prices. As soon as you are in direct competition the public has a way to compare your products to another of similar make. Quality, originality,and variety are your tools in a market of direct competition.

Factor #5. Time:

The time you have available to create will effect how you value that time. If you maille for eight hours a week, but have sixty hours a week to spare you might not value an hour of work the same as someone who only has ten hours a week to spare.

Factor #6. Income:

This to me is the biggest factor, and it effects people in conflicting ways. I find that people that have a full income from a day job but maille on the side tend to find it easier to sell very inexpensively.

hey don't rely on the maille income, and perhaps have less respect sometimes for their own work. I am of the opposite mind myself. I charge more then I might if I was trying to make a living with maille. I don't need to sell maille to survive so I feel quite comfortable charging as much as I think the product will get. I have plenty of people pass on my work because of the cost, but in the end I sell more then enough to continue to expand faster then I wish to.

You can pick and choose your competition. To suggest we are competing with Chinese sweat labor is absurd unless you intend to mass produce for chain stores. If you market yourself as a quality, handmade, and original product then your only real competition is me, and you better hope I don't move to town. Be careful not to rate yourself too cheap in the beginning as you might find it harder to raise your prices when the time come that you think it necessary. Simple fact is you can always lower a price on the fly if you feel the need, but it's allot harder to explain why you raised the price. Having higher prices while leaving room to haggle, or discount on bulk purchases allows you to maintain the price value presented while making a customer feel triumphant if you cut them a deal.

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I'd just like to point out that if you have more available markets, you might actually charge more, because it gives people a chance to return, or see you again at another venue, and you're not so reliant on that particular day to get all of your sales. It can work both ways.

My comment above about chinese labor is also more towards the act of crafting in general. I think I said it before, but if not, chainmail garments are HIGHLY specialized as a market, and chain jewelry, though more common, does get the added bonus of being jewelry, which tends to have a much higher markup than most things.

At the end of the day though, it comes down to something my mother said to me once: "It's only worth as much as someone will pay for it."

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I'd just like to point out that if you have more available markets, you might actually charge more, because it gives people a chance to return, or see you again at another venue, and you're not so reliant on that particular day to get all of your sales. It can work both ways.

Sure can. Depending on the markets. A juried art show has different expectations then a farmers market. Also if you intend to compete on Artfire, or Etsy you have different levels of competition. We all have many market options that may not make sense to compete in as well.

My comment above about chinese labor is also more towards the act of crafting in general. I think I said it before, but if not, chainmail garments are HIGHLY specialized as a market, and chain jewelry, though more common, does get the added bonus of being jewelry, which tends to have a much higher markup than most things.

Not sure what you mean now. Either you think maillers have to compete with foreign imports, or you don't. I have yet had a customer question my prices by comparing them to a store bought item. Mostly due to the fact there really isn't any comparable items on the mass market. Aside form imported armor items there is very little direct maille competition that I can see that isn't generated by the likes of the folks that frequent this site, and similar ones. Even garments can be original enough that foreign imporst are not even comparable. I use Bills bikini items as an example. He has marketed a garment that not only has a broader appeal then armor, but also has little competition within the medium.

At the end of the day though, it comes down to something my mother said to me once: "It's only worth as much as someone will pay for it."

It's worth what you tell people it's worth. If presented right you can sell anything for just about any price. Knowing your product, and having an answer for just about any challenge can dramatically increase your value. If you can answer with certainty just about any question why your product is worth the price over any other option you will have the tools to make a fair profit. Allot of sales is showmanship anyway. Waving my hand over my show display and claiming there are half a million rings all woven by me is pure marketing. Means nothing about quality, or value of the materials. However it does add a level of credibility when you explain why your bracelets are twice the cost of curb chain from the mall outlets.

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OK,

first, Most traditional jewelers charge between 50 and 150 an hour (and up). Charging 20 is hardly high for doing jewelery. I acutally make quite a bit more then that on most of my earrings.

second, Don't try to compeat with walmart on price, you can't. They sell crap and spend nothing on labor. Don't try. Create a good product, price it fairly (both for yourself and your customer) If you don't think you can sell a peice for the price you need to cover your time, DON"T MAKE IT ANYMORE. I work very hard to simplfy my designs down to something that is both unique and rapidly producable. I don't make many of the really complicated weaves because I can't make a living selling bracelets for 250, I make most of my bracelets in the 16 to 45 dollar range.

Folks, THINK. just cuz you love the way something looks doesn't mean it's worth making. Make yourself one. make one to show off, then make the fast easy stuff to sell. A lot of selling is selling quantity, not just selling single bits. I usually only have 5 or 6 necklaces on display when I do an event, because I ask 200+ for most of them. I don't expect to sell them, I use them to bait people in. Then from there I sell earrings and bracelets. Not that I don't sell the occasional 200+ peice.

there is two things to consider in pricing, realistic pricing, based on materials and time and Percieve value, which is the price the market will bear. My inexpensive earrings cost me roughly 35 cents in materials and take 5-10 minutes to make per pair. I sell them for 8 bucks a pop. Do the math.

i've been in business for a long time, I grew up in small business and I'm working on my third personal business. I learn things the hard way, but I do learn. I'm speaking from experiance, not just pulling info outta my ass.

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Waving my hand over my show display and claiming there are half a million rings all woven by me is pure marketing. Means nothing about quality, or value of the materials. However it does add a level of credibility when you explain why your bracelets are twice the cost of curb chain from the mall outlets.

This is very true: While I've only occasionally made mail for profit, I would like to point to one particular instance where I made a dice bag out of 18g 5/32" nickel silver for a friend (who plays tabletop RPG)'s birthday, and while she did like it (previously she had been using some cheap canvas one), her eyes really got big when I told her that there were over 1,000 rings that I'd each had to attach, one by one. Oftentimes, people who don't know mail won't realize exactly what kind of craftsmanship, skill and dedication goes into it if you don't put it into perspective. They may think that something is pretty, but (depending on the market) that's about all that they'll really take into consideration, is the aesthetic if you don't put it into perspective.

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OK,

first, Most traditional jewelers charge between 50 and 150 an hour (and up). Charging 20 is hardly high for doing jewelery. I acutally make quite a bit more then that on most of my earrings.

second, Don't try to compeat with walmart on price, you can't. They sell crap and spend nothing on labor. Don't try. Create a good product, price it fairly (both for yourself and your customer) If you don't think you can sell a peice for the price you need to cover your time, DON"T MAKE IT ANYMORE. I work very hard to simplfy my designs down to something that is both unique and rapidly producable. I don't make many of the really complicated weaves because I can't make a living selling bracelets for 250, I make most of my bracelets in the 16 to 45 dollar range.

Folks, THINK. just cuz you love the way something looks doesn't mean it's worth making. Make yourself one. make one to show off, then make the fast easy stuff to sell. A lot of selling is selling quantity, not just selling single bits. I usually only have 5 or 6 necklaces on display when I do an event, because I ask 200+ for most of them. I don't expect to sell them, I use them to bait people in. Then from there I sell earrings and bracelets. Not that I don't sell the occasional 200+ peice.

there is two things to consider in pricing, realistic pricing, based on materials and time and Percieve value, which is the price the market will bear. My inexpensive earrings cost me roughly 35 cents in materials and take 5-10 minutes to make per pair. I sell them for 8 bucks a pop. Do the math.

i've been in business for a long time, I grew up in small business and I'm working on my third personal business. I learn things the hard way, but I do learn. I'm speaking from experiance, not just pulling info outta my ass.

I think we operate almost exactly the same by the looks of it. Instead of the higher end jewelery as the bait I use the sculpture work.

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Not sure what you mean now. Either you think maillers have to compete with foreign imports, or you don't. I have yet had a customer question my prices by comparing them to a store bought item. Mostly due to the fact there really isn't any comparable items on the mass market. Aside form imported armor items there is very little direct maille competition that I can see that isn't generated by the likes of the folks that frequent this site, and similar ones. Even garments can be original enough that foreign imporst are not even comparable. I use Bills bikini items as an example. He has marketed a garment that not only has a broader appeal then armor, but also has little competition within the medium.

My point was that mail is one of the few areas that don't.

It's worth what you tell people it's worth. If presented right you can sell anything for just about any price. Knowing your product, and having an answer for just about any challenge can dramatically increase your value. If you can answer with certainty just about any question why your product is worth the price over any other option you will have the tools to make a fair profit. Allot of sales is showmanship anyway. Waving my hand over my show display and claiming there are half a million rings all woven by me is pure marketing. Means nothing about quality, or value of the materials. However it does add a level of credibility when you explain why your bracelets are twice the cost of curb chain from the mall outlets.

Marketing like that works best when it's used on things the consumer does not have an idea of what something should cost. If you have competitors nearby, then it's going to take more than waving your hands to say that your work is worth twice what the guy next door is. That's basically the argument that those arguing for higher prices are complaining about when their fellow mailers are charging less.

But regardless, what you are saying is true.

Too good a deal, they become mistrustful. Too steep a price, and they balk. That's where knowing your audience comes in and your aforementioned marketing. But in the end, the money you make is going to be the money in your hand. If your customer doesn't buy, then you aren't going to have that money. Sometimes marketing fails. Sometimes prices are too high or two low. But that's setting prices based on what you can get, and your skills at selling those items. It has little or nothing to do with the person who makes the pieces, but rests with the person selling them (even if they are the same person).

If I'm great at selling, I can sell you utter crap for an incredible markup and you, as the customer will walk away thinking you got a FANTASTIC deal. I can also has some SPECTACULAR work, but be horrible at sales, and walk away from an event empty handed. But at the end of the day, only the money I made that day matters. If I can't sell the stuff, then it's not worth anything. If I can sell it, it's worth a lot. I think we're saying the same thing there.

My argument though is against those that say they MUST make X number of dollars per hour of work. That's fine and dandy at your average day job, where you're paid an hourly wage whether you work your ass off or whether you sit on your thumbs all day, but when you're selling your own product it doesn't work. You sell what you sell, and whatever you walk home with that day is the money you made for those efforts.

I just believe that attaching hourly rates to a product is an endeavor in pointlessness. Besides, somewhere along the way there's bound to be some expense you're not considering. Are you also figuring in the time that you are spending selling, marketing, etc? If you use a site like etsy or ebay to list, are you figuring those into your costs as well? What about packaging? The list goes on....

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My argument though is against those that say they MUST make X number of dollars per hour of work. That's fine and dandy at your average day job, where you're paid an hourly wage whether you work your ass off or whether you sit on your thumbs all day, but when you're selling your own product it doesn't work. You sell what you sell, and whatever you walk home with that day is the money you made for those efforts.

I just believe that attaching hourly rates to a product is an endeavor in pointlessness. Besides, somewhere along the way there's bound to be some expense you're not considering. Are you also figuring in the time that you are spending selling, marketing, etc? If you use a site like etsy or ebay to list, are you figuring those into your costs as well? What about packaging? The list goes on....

I agree. I have virtually no exact hourly rate that I stick to on any products, but I do have a minimum hourly rate that I expect as compensation. I may have items that I get $60-$100 an hour return(mostly on jewelery that is made of metals that are perceived as more expensive, or on the sculpture work), but have a minimum expectation of $20 and hour no matter what. If I have a ten dollar item, I better be making them in 30 minutes, or know that I can if I want to be lazy and take my time. Over time my prices have dropped mostly due to me becoming more efficient. As Frostfly pointed out once you get a solid efficient product line as a foundation not only can you provide less expansive items, but you don't have to rely on the experiments, or artistic expression pieces for your income.

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My two rings on the subject is this: I do a lot of my mailing while I'm AT my day job. Through the grace of God and a college education, I get paid $32 an hour for regular time and double that for overtime. I tend to charge about $10/hour in labor for mail - sometimes I can get away with a bit more, depending on the buyer and the item. That comes out at $42/hr+ overall for my time. So I think that's pretty decent. :)

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My two rings on the subject is this: I do a lot of my mailing while I'm AT my day job. Through the grace of God and a college education, I get paid $32 an hour for regular time and double that for overtime. I tend to charge about $10/hour in labor for mail - sometimes I can get away with a bit more, depending on the buyer and the item. That comes out at $42/hr+ overall for my time. So I think that's pretty decent. :)

This is not me judging your reasons. Just curiosity. Knowing that you need no income from mailling, and can even likely afford to expand the hobby at your leisure why do you feel that freedom translates into a lower price other then a higher one? Is there guilt over double dipping? Do you not yet feel confident in your work? Does the guy in the next cubical make maille as well?

Again I'm not trying to alter your opinion, or critique your decisions. I am just interested in your motivations as we share some advantages that have led us to different conclusions.

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