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Wiccandove

Inventory management

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I don't really, The person I sell through does though. Typically they have a large notebook that the fill with what sold from whom, and for how much. Otherwise, the easiest way for me to manage is to have easy to remember numbers I hand over, (50 of this, 10 of that, etc.).

If you want to keep track, the easiest way should be just some simple sheets made in excel.

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I don't really, The person I sell through does though. Typically they have a large notebook that the fill with what sold from whom, and for how much. Otherwise, the easiest way for me to manage is to have easy to remember numbers I hand over, (50 of this, 10 of that, etc.).

If you want to keep track, the easiest way should be just some simple sheets made in excel.

Well I was thinking more of jump ring inventory then an item inventory, a way to determine the cost of materials for an item. I've been estimating my materials cost and am just looking for a more accurate way.

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Well I was thinking more of jump ring inventory then an item inventory, a way to determine the cost of materials for an item. I've been estimating my materials cost and am just looking for a more accurate way.

I was thinking of getting bead manager pro for just this reason. it's about $100 US

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I have a few sheets with basic counts and costs...like for all the rings i use i have every value down to the cost per ring, then i have a sheet where the weaves I make are listed where i can say "this weave has x rings per inch" and based on that I can figure out the cost to me to make a given item. this only really works for the bracelets/chains/shirts where there's standard measurements. when i make oddball pieces, i still have the cost per ring value, so i just keep track and when i'm finished a piece i usually know within a few dozen rings what the total cost was to me and I can base my price on that.

pauline's got a great sheet that she uses for her business here. ask her if you can see it.

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Ahhh.... I still sort of wing it. I work within a limited number of sizes (4mm, 6mm, and 8mm from other sources and ID's from TRL from 1/8"- 5/8") and gauges (16-21), use base metals (which are cheaper) and just estimate how many I'll use in a piece based off of various counts.

Sometimes I know the general idea of how many rings for a particular weave because I made, say 4 necklaces in that weave out of a bag of 1000 links, or I know because I count off links to make sure multiple chains will line up in a weave (i.e. japanese 6 in 1), or because I need to find a centerpoint to attach a pendant.

As for counting jump ring inventory, I know exactly how many I have of certain rings. I order fairly largish orders at times, and with particular vendors, (particularly my sources for gunmetal) I have to buy per link, so I know exactly how many I pay for... (though I trust them to ship me precisely 3,172 rings... Some times I feel like sending nasty emails complaining I've been 2-3 rings off, just to keep them on their toes, and as a sort of vengeful retaliation for not letting me buy bulk). Others, I'm not going to sit and count.

I don't find it a valuable exercise in my time to be quite that particular about my stocks. I buy a lot in stock, I use a lot, and my costs have a far higher investment in time than money. If I worked in silver or gold, then yes, the cost of materials would be vastly more than time. I don't even know if I'd invest that much time into it for silver. I used to do more wire oriented work, and I could give you estimates on costs on what I made then, just by knowing how much wire went through my hands, what stones were used, etc. Even then, the markup was based more on time than materials.

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I use Bead Manager Pro and it is a great program. I have used spreadsheets in the past and never managed to get them to be as user friendly and accurate as I wanted. I have used Bead Manager for the past few months and love it. It is extremely easy to use. It keeps track of supplies and finished product automatically and cost of materials for finished products. If you have any more questions on it, just ask and I will try and answer them for you.

Fatillians

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I have a spreedsheet that i have set up. It has all the rings priced per ring at my cost and my hourly rate and other figures. All i have to do is type in how many rings of a certain size i used and how many minutes it took to make the item, and the spreedsheet will show me my wholesale and retail prices and total ring count for the item

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As a computer engineering student, I would be inclined to write my own program for such a task. I would enter in the number of rings purchased, the total amount paid for them, and how many I've used in a project. Leave the calculation to the computer as far as price per ring, number of rings left, etc.

I am considering writing one as a matter of fact, but I haven't thought out all the little details yet (different materials, different gauges, different ID, etc.

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As a computer engineering student, I would be inclined to write my own program for such a task. I would enter in the number of rings purchased, the total amount paid for them, and how many I've used in a project. Leave the calculation to the computer as far as price per ring, number of rings left, etc.

I am considering writing one as a matter of fact, but I haven't thought out all the little details yet (different materials, different gauges, different ID, etc.

Why reinvent the wheel? There's already good software out there.

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Thats the thing about us computer engineering (IT in my case) students. We will re-invent the square if it fits our purpose better than what already exists.

I say go for it. If you can make something that works for you, then why not do so?

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Why reinvent the wheel? There's already good software out there.

I can use it for school assignments, it betters my skill in my career path, it's free, it's something I enjoy, and honestly it doesn't take that long for me to do.

If I ever get around to making a stable app, I will host it on here for free.

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I wing it so to speak. I find selling more successful if I round prices to certain product lines. Trying to price down to the minimal cost differences not only shorts me, but confuses the customer.

If I sell a single strand weave bracelet it will be the same price in byzantine, full persian, or helm. The will be the same price even if one is 20g, or one is 16g. I just make sure my price is good enough for me

if they were all the more time consuming weaves with more rings. This leaves the customer with less time to consider cost, and more time to consider their personal choice. It also lets me change prices easily from show to show, as I don't have to price individual items. I can just sell in price sections with minimal signage. Double weaves I might charge double or just 50% more like necklaces.

The larger the projects you do the less the materials cost matter. If you do garments, belts, purses, armor, or other large time consuming items the materials to me become a much smaller fraction of the cost then the time. I charge allot more for time of those projects then I do for an item that takes less then an hour. The more elaborate the items you produce, the greater the specialty and skill level that is required to produce them. An hour making common weave chain I might price at $20, but an hour sculpting I would charge double that easily.

To be honest outside of precious metals I can easily make any bracelet length single strand weave for less then a dollar, two dollars for the mid range materials like the anodized, and enameled varieties.

I also do not charge for sizing. make all my items somewhat long to be easily sized down on the spot. Explaining to a customer that you have to tack on 20 cents to the cost to size a bracelet up an inch is never a positive sales practice. Outside of gold I don't even charge for silver alterations unless it goes beyond 10% of the piece size. I just have that figured into the cost in advance. That way if they have metal removed there is no haggling on the price either.

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If I sell a single strand weave bracelet it will be the same price in byzantine, full persian, or helm. The will be the same price even if one is 20g, or one is 16g.

I can't do that. I charge based on materials costs. And byzantine or persian take more materials than helm. So I would either way over charge for helm, or lose money on the others.

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Anyone have any input for me???

I am new to the selling aspect of chainmail jewelry and I want to know what system I should be using to keep track of my finished pieces? Right now, my jewelry is being sold on consignment at my friend's coffee shop... small shop.

Bead Manager Pro looks awesome and I plan to get it some day but I am wondering if it is more than I need at this point in time... Could I get away with using some sort of spreadsheet?? If so, does anyone have a sample that I could look at (as I have no idea what kind of info I need to record!)??

THANKS!!

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I wing it so to speak. I find selling more successful if I round prices to certain product lines. Trying to price down to the minimal cost differences not only shorts me, but confuses the customer.

If I sell a single strand weave bracelet it will be the same price in byzantine, full persian, or helm. The will be the same price even if one is 20g, or one is 16g. I just make sure my price is good enough for me

if they were all the more time consuming weaves with more rings. This leaves the customer with less time to consider cost, and more time to consider their personal choice. It also lets me change prices easily from show to show, as I don't have to price individual items. I can just sell in price sections with minimal signage. Double weaves I might charge double or just 50% more like necklaces.

The larger the projects you do the less the materials cost matter. If you do garments, belts, purses, armor, or other large time consuming items the materials to me become a much smaller fraction of the cost then the time. I charge allot more for time of those projects then I do for an item that takes less then an hour. The more elaborate the items you produce, the greater the specialty and skill level that is required to produce them. An hour making common weave chain I might price at $20, but an hour sculpting I would charge double that easily.

To be honest outside of precious metals I can easily make any bracelet length single strand weave for less then a dollar, two dollars for the mid range materials like the anodized, and enameled varieties.

I also do not charge for sizing. make all my items somewhat long to be easily sized down on the spot. Explaining to a customer that you have to tack on 20 cents to the cost to size a bracelet up an inch is never a positive sales practice. Outside of gold I don't even charge for silver alterations unless it goes beyond 10% of the piece size. I just have that figured into the cost in advance. That way if they have metal removed there is no haggling on the price either.

It's almost eerie how similar you and I are, at least when it comes to making/selling stuff.

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...does anyone have a sample that I could look at (as I have no idea what kind of info I need to record!)??...

Here's what I just put together yesterday and today. You enter info into all fields except "Price" and "Price per ring", and those two fields will be calculated for you (based on my formula, shown at the bottom).

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0Al8EtbDPbRk2dEdweFE4RURuNW5qd1g3d1hXS1lYNnc&hl=en&authkey=CN3isfAP

Edited by BaruMonkey

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you can't charge the same for 20g and 16g materials unless you are just using base metals. Stainless and bronze and brass are bloody cheepy. when you start selling mostly silver and niobium you have to price things by material use. I just had to raise prices on my orginal line by 15 bucks each simplely because of the rise in silver prices from the last year. I can't replace them for the price i'm selling them at.

Honestly, you don't need a program of any sort. Excel (or open office) works just fine. take a bit of time to learn some basic formulas and it will compute all the numbers for you. Worth the effort and will give you a lot of information about your craft.

I find that I really only used about 20 sizes of ring regularly, so it's not even a long spread sheet.

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Something has been bothering me as far as ring counts per piece goes. Why do people use "rings per inch" in calculating ring counts when you could simply calculate it by weight? It would be much more precise.

I understand using it as a rough gauge for estimating the number of rings you will need to make/buy to make a trial piece. However once you get to the point of making products to sell I would think you would want to be as precise as possible, and in pieces where 1 ring size is used, or where multiple rings are used, with a known ratio, measuring weight would be a much easier and precise way of figuring ring counts per piece.

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By using rings per inch the material used is taken out of the equation. For example a weave made with sterling silver would be much heavier than the same weave made of aluminum though use the same number of rings.

Movak

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By using rings per inch the material used is taken out of the equation. For example a weave made with sterling silver would be much heavier than the same weave made of aluminum though use the same number of rings.

Movak

I guess I can understand that somewhat, however if you're going the spreadsheet route it would be easy enough to incorporate a metal designation field which would account for that. And doing so would not only be more accurate, but would also allow an easier transition to the more expensive materials where you WOULD want to change the price based on material.

Also, when talking about clothing, where you would want to have a rings per square foot type count, making a square foot of material, then weighing it to get the count would take a lot less time than going through and counting the rings.

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Here are a few issues with your argument that weight is more accurate than ring count.

1. Not everyone has an accurate scale but everyone can count.

2. In many weaves, when one is making a piece one counts the rings to see if the item is long enough.

3. If using weight there must be a conversion factor for each and every metal and alloy in existence. In TRL's case that would be about 17 factors which may change if the alloy changes.

4. When doing the calculation it is easy to forget to factor in weight change or use the wrong factor and come up with an inaccurate answer.

Here is the math needed to use the two different methods to calculate purchases from TRL using the two methods.

Weight

Weight/inch of material A * (specific gravity of material B/specific gravity of material A) * # of inches / weight per bag = # of bags

If one does not want to keep track of specific gravities the the number of conversion factors can get very large very fast. For example, with 17 different materials there are 136 different conversion factors.

Ring count

Rings per inch * # of inches / rings per bag = # of bags

rings per inch * # of inches / rings per pound = # of pounds

Counting the rings in a square foot is easy. One does not count each individual ring. All one needs to do is count the number of rings down and the number of rings across and multiply the two.

You have also stated that it would be more accurate to weigh than to count but have not stated why. I do not see how counting would be any less accurate than weighing unless the person can not count very well. In that case the person would have issues with math as well so the point is moot.

One final note is that there are a lot of sites that use rings per inch and rings per square foot. It is somewhat of a standard and changing standards is hard.

Movak

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I understand your points, and agree with most of them. When I say more accurate, I mean that very rarely (at least in my experience) does a weave come out to be exactly "1 inch". Usually it's a little over or a little under. So if you take a count from the rings per inch measurement to count out what you will use, meaning to make a 18inch necklace for instance, you will in fact be above or below your target measurement.

Another example, I personally don't count rings when I maille, because usually I'm doing it in short stints between doing something else, so I usually don't finish what I'm working on in one sitting. So if I am making something that I'm going to do a lot of to sell, like a necklace. It would be easier to simply make the first one to my satisfaction, then weigh it, then parcel out my rings per item by weight.

No it is not a perfect solution, and it doesn't work in all instances or for all things. I just think when it comes to keeping track of smaller items to sell, or if you are making your own rings, doing it by weight would seem to be easier. At least for me.

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