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Making LOTR Mithril

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That sounds good. The SS1918 should flow really well. The thing I like about making E4-1 mesh out of rings that small is that it moves like cloth. I will be interested to see pictures as well, once you get really into the project.

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That sounds good. The SS1918 should flow really well. The thing I like about making E4-1 mesh out of rings that small is that it moves like cloth. I will be interested to see pictures as well, once you get really into the project.

Yeah. I should also work on getting a camera with more than 3 megapixels, though. :P

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As an update on this whole project, I began work yesterday. Holy Hell. This'll take awhile. Good news is that the guy who usually does my powdercoating says that he CAN powdercoat the mail to a silver finish, giving the piece a much more movie-accurate look.

I would love to know how someone will be able to power coat finished maille. Remember that powder coating is electrically charged powder that is attracted to an opposite charged piece and then baked on. Anywhere two rings touch the powder coating will form a bond between the rings and form a solid sheet. I would have him try with a small piece before trying the whole thing. Good luck. I hope it works.

Movak

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I would love to know how someone will be able to power coat finished maille. Remember that powder coating is electrically charged powder that is attracted to an opposite charged piece and then baked on. Anywhere two rings touch the powder coating will form a bond between the rings and form a solid sheet. I would have him try with a small piece before trying the whole thing. Good luck. I hope it works.

Movak

That is a good point. I would think that powder coating would work best on loose rings, then weaving them. To protect the coat, Nylon jaw pliers would be best, but I don't know how well that would work with SS rings of any size. You could use a set of toothless pliers, but if you slip at all, you could damage the powder coat. I you do go with this option, I would suggest making at least 5% more rings than you think the project will take. That should account for any discolored rings, and rings that are damaged during construction.

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Here are a few discussions about powder coating. 1, 2, and 3.

The concensus is that powder coating rings does not work.

Movak

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I'm using the exact same rings for a shirt as well. (No worries about copying, I came up with the idea about a month or so ago, and it's not to be a replica of anything particular). I hope to figure out, by the time I'm done, a method of tumbling said piece (that works for me anyhow) and then looking into buying some gun blacking to treat the rings with. Hopefully they'll come out with a nice shiny black coat. (I've looked into it a little bit and apparently it's just heating slightly, soaking and rubbing off the excess.)

I'm not sure what sort of finish you want on your rings, but you might want to consider something similar. I also looked into it not too long ago as a coat to protect my blackened finish. There's basically two products I'm eyeing to play with, (that are available for sale. There's plenty of sites to products that lead nowhere really). One is this, a clear coat that's used for automotive purposes, and typically for vinyl, however, I have seen it mentioned here and there on other boards (related to automotive purposes) where someone just uses it on the whole section of the car body without much ado. The other is a bit more nebulous, here, which is supposedly a crack-proof acrylic coat. Basically, the internet says that most clear coats will be fine, as long as they have flexible additives to increase, well, the flexibility of the finish. Personally, I'd go with the former rather than the latter, and probably test it out with a handful of rings and see how the coat maintains while manipulating them. Then you might want to try and force rust on them to see if it holds up... Or just give it a go and see how it works.

I know it's not a perfect answer, but trust me, it's the best I could come up with. :S

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Attempting to spray coat rings before or after weaving has been attempted many times before and everyone has failed. The main issue is that to coat rings with a spray one must gave access to every surface without anything touching that surface. The reason anodizing works is that the coil is attached at one end to the electical source and the solution has access to all surfaces. How do you hold coils so spray can get evenly down the middle? How do you hold a single ring so that all surfaces can be coated? What about the spot you are holding? Powder coating looks like it should work but the coating is brittle.

You might need to try the 20G1/8" anodized white of Bright aluminum.

Remember that the original shirt was only seen for a couple of short shots and was probably "enhanced" in post production.

Movak

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Well, that's true.... Perhaps painstakingly turning over each ring with each coat, and applying some moderate (hairdryer type) heat before applying each layer to enhance drying times, but....

Weeeeelllllll... barring that, the other anti-rust idea that's popular is an oil coating. It has to be applied regularly, and is part of constant maintenance, but it should work too. I prefer going stainless and to hell with the "rust". It's not like I plan on making such a piece and trudging daily through the Everglades or parts wherefore unknown in Cambodia...

Hmmm.. makes me wonder if inconel might be an interesting substitute, however TRL has virtually no inconel in stock (nor plans to it seems) and nobody seems to give it a shot so...

Though now I have interest in it just to give it a shot... Oh well.. :S

You know what? Screw it. if you want a silver color go nickel silver (unless the customer has an allergic reaction to nickel). It'll only have the slightest gold tone (unless TRL's is different from what I've seen elsewhere) and it won't be as harsh to work with as your Stainless.

BTw, three days into it here. I got a few strips to join, but I think after that I'll have a piece 4-5 inches wide by 20-24 inches long. About a third of my 10,000 rings done, and 2/3 more to go.... XD

I hope your client is paying big.

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The OP wants to duplicate the bright silver of the shirt in the movie. He is not concerned with rust so oil is out. Nickle silver has a yellowish cast and darkens with age so will not work. The closests is White AA or bright aluminum.

Movak

Edited by Movak

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I had the thought that I should share this picture. It is of the GS2018 mesh that I am working on. Just to show how much room you have to work with. I like the way that the 2018 works. The 1918 will fill it in a bit more.

micro.jpg

I should point out that these were all pinch cut, and that is what I wanted to do with this one.

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Hey everyone. I need some research help. I got what I think to be one of the roughest commissions ever the other day. Someone wanted me to make a replica of Frodo's Mithril vest from The Lord of the Rings. At first, I almost laughed at the idea. After a while, though, it sounded too cool to pass up, so I can probably kiss the next year of my life goodbye! Anyway, I did some research, and the guy who directed the movie said that, in order to make the maille, they dismantled several butcher's gloves, linked them into a shirt, then spraypainted it. Not as cool as one might think, huh? I plan on using the same format of rings. Problem is, I don't know what size rings are incorporated into Butcher's gloves.I did research, but nothing came up, and I don't want to buy an expensive sample piece. Does anyone here have any ideas? Thanks.

Butcher's maille uses approx 24g wire in a 7/64" ID ring. The exact sizes range between 0.5-0.55mm wire diameter and 3.6-4.0mm outer diameter depending on manufacturer.

At that size welding the rings is a necessity and you'd be well advised to have them electroless nickel plated rather than any type of paint.

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