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Aging Bronze

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I have found that liver of Sulfur works well much like a "oil rubbed bronze effect" but essentially any rapid oxidizer will work but most are very caustic so be careful

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To further that not just liver of sulfur but stabilized liver of sulfur. Stabilized comes in a gel form that is SUPER easy to control and gives great results. If you go the crystal route that some swear by you can still obtain great results but it takes a lot of testing to get the right levels. Either way you decide to go I recommend making little tester pieces so you can play around with the solution to get your desired result.

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Where do I find either item?

I think I found it in the pharmacy when I looked for it. Not sure what people use it for apart from stuff like this.

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I think I found it in the pharmacy when I looked for it. Not sure what people use it for apart from stuff like this.

apparently arthritis, but sulfides are also apparently toxic, so it's either not used much or at all anymore. (at least this is according to wiki.)

one source: http://shop.rings-things.com/cart/pc/Antiquing-Patina-Solutions-c1990.htm

but they do have a $50 minimum order, but they also have plenty of other things to make that minimum...

Another: https://www.monsterslayer.com/Pages/Polish/PolishES.aspx

I don't think they have the same minimums (if any), and also have a crapload of great supplies other than LoS.

I've used both sources many times before, and are some of my favorite sources for jewelry materials that I can't find from TRL.

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You have what you need right at hand. Urine has traditionally been used and is easily controlled. It takes several hours to several weeks (depending on strength). Cellini's Treatises on Goldsmithing provides numerous mentions and recipes. The best is said to be first morning urine of a red haired virgin. In the 70's I chained a sculpture in the men's urinal at my university for nearly six months and was amazed at the patina. Enjoy

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Hard boils some eggs. Separate the yolks and put them in a container and then place the item in you want to patina. Leave over night. You don't need more then an egg or two for a jewelery piece. Maybe a few more if it's something large. You should have a nice patina by morning. Then just polish to the quality you want. The yolks contain sulfur and the longer they are cooked the stronger they will be. It is the same as liver of sulfur. If you want to really darken a piece you can smash the cooked yolks in a bag and throw the piece in the bag and coat it for the night. Silver will come out near black which creates a really nice effect once polished if the piece has a lot of texture.

Edited by Borealis Metal Works

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I heard that one before Borealis. It apparently works really well.

Well, one night so far, and my ammonia solution isn't doing much of anything. Didn't really think it would, but we'll go a few more days. Eggs and most of the non-urine-y solutions are simple enough to understand. they all have sulfur which is being used to age the copper in the metals.

Here's a page on various methods of aging copper: http://metaldetectingworld.com/cleaning_coin_p22_tarnishing.shtml

(in fact, looking at that link, methinks it should be bookmarked for my future researches.. :S )

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I did try the egg yolk trick, but it didn't seem to work for me. I have a fairly large piece that I'm trying to age. I will try it again and use more yolks this time.

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I did try the egg yolk trick, but it didn't seem to work for me. I have a fairly large piece that I'm trying to age. I will try it again and use more yolks this time.

When you say large piece do you mean as large or larger then a frying pan or like a solid armor piece? Is there any chance there are any coatings, oils, or chemicals of any kind that might remain from previous polishing? Is it in a sealed container? Might have to just mash it up and apply it directly if the piece is easily cleaned. If that doesn't work then there is something being used to seal the metal preventing the oxidation.

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It's an inlay a bit bigger then a Legal sized sheet of paper. It's made out of Stainless Steel and Bronze. Not sure about coatings or oils. It's the Bronze rings from the Ring Lord. Yes the egg yolk was in a sealed container with the item I'm trying to tranish. It wasn't mashed into the rings but it was broken up in to small pieces.

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hmm... The egg yolk trick may not work with a piece that size. There's just not that much sulfur in the eggs I'd be willing to believe. If you add more, it may work better, but I'm also hesitant to say that it might result in a very uneven tarnish. You're probably better off with a wash. With a large chunk of metal, have you considered trying just spraying it with salt water, leaving it out in the sun, and repeating a few dozen times? After it tarnishes, you can always wash off the salt and excess tarnish.

OOOOOR.... if you live by a highway or busy road, leave it somewhere nearby, and let the car exhaust hit it. A funny thing about city life is that it causes metals to tarnish quicker due to the pollutants in the air.

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One main thing about the egg yolk method is that the yolk must not touch the metal. One needs to wrap the egg in a wet paper towel and put it in the sealed bag with the item. It is not contact with the yolk but the gas that is given off that tarnishes the metal. Putting the bag in a warm environment, like direct sunlight, will hasten the process.

Movak

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It's been a while - any luck?

If it doesn't age quickly on it's own just from wearing it's probably been blended with metals that are to slow this process - thus hampering your efforts to force it.

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