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  1. Today
  2. Konstantin the Red

    Newb Help with Persian 4 in 1

    So: expansions. An expansion is like a piece, a Unit (see above) of E5-1 in a field of E4-1. With the four links in the corners and one in the center, a fifth link is inserted between the two lower corner-links. This extra link hangs slightly lower than the original two. Because the center link is circular, naturally. The following row of links now has one more link to weave to, which makes it longer, expanding things. Every expansion link inserted adds one ID's worth of further length to the linkrow below it. That makes calculating how many expansions you need for the job easy. The great thing about triangular expansion arrays -- the expansions push them into triangular shapes -- is their great flexibility: you can have one link's worth of expansion, or you can add in lots. Making the triangle pretty wide. In .063" wire and 1/4" ID, you'll have all the room you need to insert that fifth (expansion) link. Appreciably tighter mail weave wouldn't have room to insert a full-thickness link. *But* if you really gotta do it, instead of an expansion link, you can insert an expansion hole -- a deliberate flaw in the weave. The simplest way to do (and explain) this trick is to use a twist tie to make like a temporary expansion link inside that cramped center link, then weave the next row on, treating the looped twist tie like it was the expansion link, and weave along normally, and putting in another row or two of links below where the twist tie is to make things stable. Then take the twist tie out; the hole in the weave is nearly invisible. Even if you don't need the trick, it's nice to know if you're making dense mail. Contractions and contraction arrays: they're just expansions turned upside down. Simple, eh? You can weave a contraction into mail weave just by hooking your open link through not two, but three, links in the row above it in the weave. This snugs up everything by one link ID. Or you can make contraction arrays out of expansion arrays by turning either one point up or point down -- that's if you pre-made your arrays. All you need to keep track of is that the links at the wider bases of both the triangles are angling in the same direction -- so you can simply zip them together with one single row of links which will angle in the opposite direction, or link-lie.
  3. Konstantin the Red

    Newb Help with Persian 4 in 1

    Roger that, xbitgeek. Not really necessary to use a mannequin if you're building for your own self -- then you can be your own mannequin -- but it doesn't hurt anything. You can always build mailpatches, both rectangular and expansion-triangle, and zip 'em on. Since mail is so much like knitting a sweater, it doesn't matter at all which direction you do your weaving in. I think I've woven E4-1 in every direction possible except the diagonal. And maybe you can do that! -- though I couldn't say why. Generating the mail weave in a row-wise direction -- horizontal worn on you, and the resilient direction -- or a columnwise direction -- vertical, and also the non-resilient direction -- both work just fine, so no worries. It varies a little with which way is best for generating a certain shape of mailpiece -- like if you made a belt or part of a belt of the stuff, you'd make it go row-wise, weaving. Part of a shirt -- that, I always start columnwise for just a bit, to establish the vertical height of the patch I'm making. It could be any height at all from three links' worth, to (pick a number out of the air) a couple hundred. Big enough for most things, and also kinda heavy to push around on your workbench, or the living room rug, by the time you're nearly done. I have an article in the M.A.I.L. library describing how I make a rectangular mail patch large enough to wrap entirely around my body, and with slack. That's how I used to do that kind of thing; now I think I'd work a little smaller, for convenience in inserting a triangular expansion array over each shoulder blade and then getting around to filling in between those, and taking care of the over-the- shoulder parts of the shirt, which when all is said and done is a) a rectangle, with b) a neckhole included, offset to forward -- bcs anatomy! -- and c) with expansion arrays reaching up onto the left and right shoulders about the middle of your trapezius muscles, which bend the sides of the rectangle outwards on the rear half of the shoulder rectangle, for that slack in the back I mentioned. But the large rectangle starts out sooooper simple: all I do is make a chain of alternating double and single links, 2 links 1 link 2 links 1 link as long as I like until it's long enough, and I finish it up with 1 link 2 links, stop. I smooth this chain out on the worksurface so all the links lie flat and in good order; nothing twisted: the doubled links angle up one way, the single links angle up the opposite way. That is the columnar-generated part, and is the first three columns of links on one side of a mail patch. Then I build onto the side of that chain. You've spread its length right and left in front of you, so you're probably adding on links to the edge nearest you. You could call it the bottom edge, though it really doesn't matter to the mail fabric. I like to cast links onto this edge of the long chain two links at a time. We call that "speedweaving" and okay, it at least feels like we're going faster, sticking two columns of links on at every go, generating and widening the mailpatch row-wise, along its resilient direction. That resilience won't be any too obvious until you've gotten it about ten links wide, but you'll get there. Probably just about the time your palms start getting sore! The very first of the two-fer links you cast onto that chain is really a three-fer: put two closed links in an opened link, then weave the open link into the edge of that chain, and close it. Now you have a 2-1-2-1 chain with a little L shaped tab on one end -- which is now 3-2-3-1-2-1-2 on down. The inside corner of the tab now presents you with three links to weave an open link through, and you can hang a closed link in it to make up the fourth link, in the fourth corner. Close that central link, and your L tab on the end is now fatter. Continue so on down your chain until you complete a whole chain of 3 links 2 links 3-2-3...2-3 stop. Now it looks less like a chain and more like a strap, doesn't it? Now you get to go back and start all over again! Isn't that just tons of fun? Eventually you've filled in a whole rectangle; part of a shirt. Big or small matters not at all. One way I size how tall the body rectangle is going to be is making that chain of singles and doubles -- another way to think of it is as a chain of "E4-1 Basic Units" as the Bladeturner mailshirt tutor calls them: tiny squares of mail links, four at the corners and one central one woven through the other four, hence 4-in-1 -- which you can see is exactly what's making up that chain -- is to make that chain long enough to stretch from high in my armpit down to the hem of the shirt, say mid thigh. Or, for some tailoring purposes, only going down from armpit to belt line, skirt and hem part to be added on below later. That trick works nicely for hauberks, which are pretty lengthy, descending to the kneecap, and wanting a bit of knowledgeable attention paid (more expansion arrays) to both the skirts and the riders' slits dividing them, so the slits stay slits and don't leave an inverted-V gap aimed right at your crotch. Hauberks are also the biggest and heaviest mail shirts. You are probably planning the more generic sort of shirt, the haburgeon: mid-thigh length or a bit higher, short or half sleeved. More advanced than the vest-like, vest-sized byrnie, which Beowulf wore. Story is, he could swim in it. (!) Strong dude. When building a shirt, avoid thinking of folding over your shoulders like a serape; instead, think in terms of going around you, front, back, and sides -- ending up with a tubelike shape that flares up somewhat wider at the top end right about where you take a chest measurement, the tailor tape under your arms. Then top it off with the shoulder section. No rule against making the shoulder section first thing and draping it on your shoulders to check for fit -- and *then* making the body barrel and zipping its top onto the shoulderpiece's edges, for all of the shirt except its sleeves, short or long. The 14th-century haburgeon had short to half sleeves; the 15th-century infantry or light horse shirt differed in having long sleeves, like a late-model hauberk's. My enthusiasm has made this novella long enough, so enjoy.
  4. Yesterday
  5. Marie's Maille

    Anodized Aluminum

    Thank you
  6. xbitgeek

    Newb Help with Persian 4 in 1

    Hey guys. For the time being I scrubbed the inlay project. Currently working on a 4 in1 16g chainmail shirt. Trying to wrap my head around doing expansions. In Butted Mail: A Mail Makers Guide, the weave starts with the links going vertically. Once the weave is started do you rotate it and continue the weave horizontally? I apologize if this is stupid question but my brain is stuck here Kon: mold = mannequin Thanks all!
  7. Chiquilin

    Making electrical wire non-tarnishing

    Thanx for all the choices. What I've figured is I'll just use the rings I'm making to do practice pieces. Get my familiarized with what I'm doing.
  8. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Anodized Aluminum

    Yes, there are enough sizes. As stated we estimate they will restock at the end of the month.
  9. Marie's Maille

    Anodized Aluminum

    Are there enough sizes of orange out of stock to warrant making rings?
  10. Jeff

    Newb Help with Persian 4 in 1

    First I was mistaken in aluminum being cheaper as I didn't notice it is about 600 rings per bag as opposed to 300 for aluminum. that being said I agreed that steel was better for combat, but the OP mentioned he wanted to do an inlay in his first post so that is why I asked what he was making this for as aluminum would give more options for colors and be less work to bend.
  11. lorenzo

    Making electrical wire non-tarnishing

    That's a bit tricky, electroplating is the best solution if you're up to it. Silver or gold being the most popular choices. You can kind of get a clear coat plastic to stick to finished chains if you do it just right but it's not ideal. Renaissance wax is a good solution but needs to be re-applied periodically.
  12. Hey there, Long-time enthusiast, short-time "actually-doing-it-myself-ist." I've been working on a chainmail pouch, and recently, following a visit to the Sterling Renaissance Festival, was inspired to start messing around with scale mail. In my head I see myself finishing this chain pouch with several rows of scales around the top. But the rings that I purchased along with the scales (recommended by the site as most compatible) differ in size from the ones the pouch is made of (ones I've wound and cut myself). So I guess I'm looking for advice on what routes I can take here, and what might work best; whether it's just adding a layer of the smaller scale mail rings and working off of those, or putting together the layers of scales and somehow attaching that over top of the existing bag and giving it a little girth around the mouth of the bag. I'm not super artistically minded, I just like making the stuff, so I appreciate any feedback you might have! -Alex
  13. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Stainless Steel - Black and Plain

    We will restock ss16516 in about a month. It will be longer for bulk. Wire should be here very soon so we can make bulk after bagged is complete. So likely 2 months from now.
  14. Eric

    Stainless Steel - Black and Plain

    SS16516-bulk out of stock 😨
  15. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Anodized Aluminum

    We will do our best to get orange made and restocked by the end of the month. I can't give you a 100% guarantee as it depends on some factors out of our control. Some colors are made less frequently because they are slower sellers. It's not that other colors are taking the spot of orange being anodized. We need more than one size to be out of stock so there is enough for us to anodize and keep costs where they are.
  16. Marie's Maille

    Anodized Aluminum

    The timing for the orange rings has been pushed off and still says estimated. How firm is the end of this month? And as much as I love limited edition colors, I don't understand why you are doing that when other colors are out of stock. I know you only do orange once a year but 18 1/4 has been out of stock for several months now.
  17. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Anodized Aluminum

    Yes, we will be stocking this as a regular item.
  18. Mike Hemp

    Anodized Aluminum

    Is Electric Violet going to start being a regular in-stock item? I absolutely love the color and want to be able to get it regularly.
  19. Last week
  20. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Scales - all materials and sizes

    We only have yellow in the bright thin anodized aluminum and the polycarbonate.
  21. Konstantin the Red

    Newb Help with Persian 4 in 1

    Jeff, you mean you can find aluminum wire cheaper than you can find galvanized steel? Color me rather surprised. Generally, the way to buy wire most cheaply is in bulk, by weight -- priced by the pound. It's probably a dollar a pound or so for galvy wire, which is perfectly fine for butted mail you intend to get beat on in, say, the SCA sword game. Aluminum is more easily bent, and hence more easy to beat up and grow holes in, too. I wonder what xbitgeek means by 'mold,' as I don't mold anything when I'm weaving mail -- it's all taking wire and bending it, one way and another. A dress-form/mannequin? You can get a good idea what's needed for a shirt for yourself if you put on a hoodie and a sweatshirt, both at once, and then the mail over both. Whatever you've got that's thick; even a light jacket. See if anything's going tight with the mail on. You have enough circumference to your shirt -- and enough slack in the right places -- if you can cross one arm over the other in front of you at the elbows without the shirt binding you. If it does, add more mail in the back of the shirt to give a little more slack. If you're building a longsleeve shirt, you'll want to be able to bend those elbows too, reaching back to touch your opposite shoulders. Along its resilient direction, E4-1 mail pretends to be elastic, because of the way the links are aligned. Since a shirt of mail amounts to a metal chain in two dimensions, it acts like a metal chain when it comes to full tension. At that point, like a tow-chain under load, it stops hard. Ya got no more. So what you're after is to have enough mail to leave a little bit of slack in the mail when your body has come to its limit of motion. Some of that is cut-and-try, but experience shows that about a handspan more width across the back of the shirt at the shoulders than across the chest gives enough slack to give your arms freedom forward, where your anatomy allows it -- our arms don't go as far backward as they do forward, and the sleeves on a mailshirt will have to reflect that.
  22. withtehwind

    Scales - all materials and sizes

    I'm looking to order some small AA scales in yellow. Do you offer these in non-bright? Or, is bright yellow the only yellow you have in the small scales? Thanks!
  23. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Titanium - Anodized and Plain

    All of the small ti strip we got has been made into the z-special scales that are on the website. There is no ETA at this time on new strip. There are no plans to make large anodized ti scales at this time. They can be ordered as a custom product, though. Contact customer service for more info.
  24. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Scales - all materials and sizes

    We are waiting for strip to come in, so estimate is currently 2-3 months.
  25. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Anodized Aluminum

    All out of stock orange has an estimated restock for the end of this month. sxma1614red will restock next Monday.
  26. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Anodized Aluminum

    This will restock at the end of this month.
  27. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Scales - all materials and sizes

    These will restock at the end of the month.
  28. Jodey - TRL Tier 2 Support

    Anodized Aluminum

    I apologize for the delay - this will restock Thurs or Fri of this week.
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